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Miscellaneous Notes on the History of
Streets, Roads and Public Works in Chester County

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This file contains assorted facts from Chester County history collected by students in the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

This file has not been completely proofread, nor have the sources been verified, so use this material with caution.

Collected by Jim Jones, David Flogaus, Kelly Kulp-Bosler, Mike Wolford and Bob Gialanella (Spring 1995). Additional information collected by Daniel Cleary, John Morrison, Scott Harre, and Robert Troutman (Spring 1996); and by Nicole Bowman, Karin Flippin, Mary Kurtak, Kelly McVeigh, Wendy Smoker, and Brian Toombes (Spring 1997).


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--------------------------------
1683      Norma Jacob, editor, QUAKER ROOTS: THE STORY OF WESTERN
          QUARTERLY MEETING OF PHILADELPHIA YEARLY MEETING OF THE
          RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (Kennett Square, Pa.:
          Graphics Standard, Inc, 1980), 2.

     William Penn laid out Street Road (PA926) in a straight line
     to connect a number of Quaker communities.

--------------------------------
1737      Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple,
          1926), 89.

     In 1737, John Chadd was authorized by the county
     commissioners to operate a ferry across the Brandywine Creek
     on the Baltimore to Philadelphia road.

--------------------------------
1794      "Brandywine Canal" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 24, 1896).

     A 1794 Act of the PA State Legislature authorized the
     construction of a canal for 25 miles along the Brandywine
     River above Wilmington.  Edward Darlington, father of Dr.
     William Darlington and Ziba Darlington, promoted the canal
     scheme, which never came to fruition.  

--------------------------------
1802      W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
          People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 884.

     A small market was built behind the public buildings in West
     Chester in 1802, but it was not very successful because
     merchants preferred to visit their customers at home.  (JJ:
     probably using wagons)  The town built a bigger market on
     Market Street in 1831 and enlarged it several times in the
     subsequent 20-25 years.

--------------------------------
1803      Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple,
          1926), 90.

     A road from Wilmington to Reading via West Chester was built
     at an early date.  It was extended in 1803 with a turnpike
     from Downington to Harrisburg via Honeybrook and Ephrata,
     and became known as the "Horsehoe Pike."

--------------------------------
1809      W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
          People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 885.

     Dr. William Darlington laid West Chester's first foot
     pavement using flagstones in 1809.  Several other private
     individuals followed his example, and started to use bricks
     instead of stones.  

--------------------------------
1815-1825      Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
               COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
               Temple, 1926), 92.

     There was little canal construction in Chester County,
     except along the Schuykill River between 1815-1825. 
     However, John Fitch of Bucks County operated regular
     steamboat service between Wilmington, Chester, Philadelphia
     and Trenton as early as 1787.

--------------------------------
1820-1833      Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     During the period 1820-1833, a large horse wagon freighting
     and passenger business existed between Philadelphia and
     Pittsburgh.  A line of four stages ran through Chester
     County along the Lancaster Pike.

--------------------------------
1823      Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
          CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
          BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME
          ... (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F.
          James, printer, 1857), 28.

     West Chester received its first sidewalks in 1823.  They
     were made of brick.  The first MacAdam streets were laid in
     1829-1830.

--------------------------------
1823      W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
          People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 885.

     In 1823, the town began to systematically lay brick
     sidewalks.

--------------------------------
1829-1830      W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and
               its People (Chicago and New York: The Union
               History Company, 1898), 885.

     In 1829 and 1830, Gay and Church Streets in West Chester
     were paved for the first time.

--------------------------------
1830      Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
          CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
          BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME
          ... (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F.
          James, printer, 1857), 36.

     The state authorized the survey of a road from New Hope to
     Oxford via Doylestown, Norristown, West Chester and Kennett.

--------------------------------
1837      Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple,
          1926), 32.

     Illustration: engraved picture showing the intersection of
     High and Market Streets in 1837. (Courtesy of the National
     Bank of Chester County)  JJ: It appears to show the
     courthouse on the left, with a clock tower and weather vane
     similar to the present one.  That makes me think that this
     picture must be of the view towards the north.  However, it
     must be the old courthouse, since this picture is dated
     earlier than 1846 (see notes from p76).  Note the use of
     stone slabs to provide a pedestrian crossing at the
     intersection of the dirt streets.

--------------------------------
1840s     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Pottery Row was "one of the real
     old rows in West Chester" on the south side of Gay Street
     west of New Street.  It was built before 1848 by the father
     of Philip Sharpless, and later operated by Enos Smedley, who
     lived at the corner of S. High Street and Nields Street.

--------------------------------
1846-1847/.lab.st.con.    Resource Survey (1985), in Historical
                         Society of the Phoenixville Area.

     By 1846, the population of Phoenixville had grown to 1,680
     people.  In response to an acute housing shortage, the
     Reeves, Buck, and Company began to build houses for its
     employees, which numbered about 300 by 1846.  In 1847, "over
     two hundred buildings were erected" including Nailers' Row,
     and Puddlers' Row.  Puddlers' Row no longer exists, but
     Nailers' Row remains as the earliest surviving houses
     directly associated with the nineteenth century iron
     industry.  Other surviving workers' housing can be found on
     E. Walnut Street, E. Morgan Street, and Hall Street (a.k.a.
     Old Row, Red Row, and Cottage Row, respectively).

--------------------------------
1848      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Portico Row on the south side of
     West Miner Street, between New and Wayne Street, was built
     in 1848-1849 by several investors including Bentley Worth,
     Thomas Bateman, William Shields, Edwin Otley.

--------------------------------
1850s     Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple,
          1926), 85.

     One of several "underground railroad" routes passed from
     Kennett, East Bradford, West Chester, Willistown and on to
     Philadelphia.

--------------------------------
1852-1861/.st.lab.bus.con.     Resource Survey (1985), Historical
                              Society of the Phoenixville Area.

     In 1854, new worker housing constructed on Hall Street in
     Phoenixville was given the designation "Cottage Row."  The
     structures were similar to housing on W. Mill Street only in
     that they were constructed on stone.  Hall Street developed
     five years later than Mill Street (therefore approx. 1852). 
     By building worker housing, the Reeves, Buck & Company
     initiated the iron industry support system on a village
     setting.  The iron company collected rent and maintained
     control over these homes.  During the Civil War, those
     people that resided in the tenant houses were not obligated
     to pay rent if the head of the household was fighting for
     his country.

--------------------------------
1853      Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A HISTORY
          (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes Bros.
          & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
          Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and
          editors, THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh
          and Eighth Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes
          Family Organization, Inc., 1979), 252.

     Josiah Hoopes started his nursery in 1853 with specimens
     shipped from "the great house of James Backus & Son of York,
     England."

--------------------------------
1854-1856/.st.con.lab.    Resource Survey (1985), in Historical
                         Society of the Phoenixville Area.

     Originally named Webster Street (now known as Walnut
     Street), this street in Phoenixville was the middle cartway
     of the planned worker development by the Reeves, Buck &
     Company.  Designated "Old Row," it is the only street in
     this section with housing built on both sides.  Houses were
     constructed approximately 1854, with ownership passing to
     Phoenixville Iron Company after 1856.  (Houses were
     constructed of frame instead of stone, contributing to the
     possibility that this was also known as  Frame Row .)

--------------------------------
1856      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  There were two areas in West
     Chester known as "squares"--Clinton Square built about 1856
     by carpenter Dewitt Clinton north of Biddle and west of
     Darlington; and Wayne Square southeast of the corner at
     Miner and Walnut, built by Henry C. Baldwin about 1876.

--------------------------------
1857      W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
          People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 885.

     By 1857, almost all of the sidewalks in West Chester were
     bricked, and its streets were much improved.

--------------------------------
1857      William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
          CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
          BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME..
          . (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F.
          James, printer, 1857, 105.

     Five stage coach routes are listed in the advertisement. 
     Their fares ranged from sixty-two and a half cents to $2.00. 
     The Philadelphia Stage ran from West Chester at 7:00 A.M.
     and left Philadelphia at 1:30 PM with a fare of 62 1/2
     cents.  Proprietors: Starhouse & Company.

--------------------------------
1860s     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  John George's Rows were built by
     John George, a tailor on East Gay Street between High and
     Walnut, after 1857.  They were built for "colored" 
     residents around Market and Franklin Streets.

--------------------------------
1870      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Academy Row consisted of four 3-
     story brick houses on the south side of Gay Street west of
     Darlington on the site of the old West Chester Academy. 
     They were built about 1878 by a group of men including Reese
     and Eli Palmer, Sharpless and Hall, Lewis W. Shields,
     Bentley Worth.

--------------------------------
1871      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Thumblatch Row was eleven 2-story
     houses on the west side of Franklin Street north of Chestnut
     Street.  They were built by James H. Naylor, William Welch,
     George Kerr and others about 1871.  They included a store at
     the corner of Franklin and Chestnut, operated by John
     Loomis.

--------------------------------
1873/08/22     "The Omnibus Question Again" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (August 22, 1873).

     This is an editorial (one of many in 1873) calling for
     someone to start an omnibus service to deliver passengers
     from the train station to various locations in West Chester. 
     It mentions other successful WC entrepreneurs, including
     Henry Baldwin, who started a sash and planing mill, John
     Heed, who started a local express company, the Hoopes
     Borthers (spoke factory), Mssrs. Damon & Spealman
     (agricultural machine shop).

     NOTE: other articles on the topic include "That Omnibus"
     (August 18, 1873), "Omnibuses in West Chester (August 18,
     1873), "About that Omnibus " (August 20, 1873 and August 21,
     1873), "That Omnibus Question" (August 28, 1873), all in the
     DAILY LOCAL NEWS.

--------------------------------
1873/12/08     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 8, 1873).

     Moses G. Hepburn started an omnibus service this morning,
     but not one of the fifty passengers on the 9h50 train used
     it.  [Note: Hepburn was a mulatto, considered black by West
     Chester residents.]

--------------------------------
1874/03/17     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 17, 1874).

     Although ridership was meager, Moses G. Hepburn vowed to
     continue to operate his omnibus service in West Chester. 
     [Note: Hepburn was a mulatto, considered black by West
     Chester residents.]

--------------------------------
1876      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  There were two areas in West
     Chester known as "squares"--Clinton Square built about 1856
     by carpenter Dewitt Clinton north of Biddle and west of
     Darlington; and Wayne Square southeast of the corner at
     Miner and Walnut, built by Henry C. Baldwin about 1876.

--------------------------------
1880s?    DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Mud Row was a long row of 2-story
     houses on the east side of South Bolmar Street built by
     William Thompson to house the employees at his nearby
     brickyard.  He built them of ordinary brick and plastered
     their walls; later, a local real estate agent whitewashed
     the walls and advertised the place as "Marble Terrace."

--------------------------------
1883      BREOU'S ORIGINAL SERIES OF FARM MAPS, CHESTER COUNTY
          (Philadelphia: W. H. Kirk & Co., 1883), 18-19.

     South Franklin Street ended at Greenfield Alley and East
     Nields Street ended at the PRR tracks.  Linden Street ended
     at Matlack Street.

--------------------------------
1888      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Sixty years ago, cheap houses
     rented well for about $10-12/month.

--------------------------------
1888      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  There were two "Mechanics' Rows" in
     West Chester.  The first was on the north side of Miner
     Street between New and Wayne Streets, and occupied by "a
     number of the prosperous mechanics in town."  The second was
     located on the south side of Union Street between Matlack
     and Walnut.  In 1888, they were occupied by the following
     men and their families: Samuel Thompson, housepainter (116),
     Jeremiah Denney, coachman (118), Eber Townsend, carpenter
     (122), E. W. Patchell, railroad brakeman (124), William
     Highley, nurseryman (128), Wilmer W. Moses, carpenter (130),
     George E. Malin, carpenter (136), Thomas E. O'Connell,
     contractor (140), Frank Kilpatrick, carpenter (142).

--------------------------------
1890s     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Peanut Row was a row of smaller
     houses on East Nields Street east of Walnut Street.  They
     were built by George and Benjamin Muzante, dried fruit
     dealers who built a number of other houses in the southeast
     part of the borough.

--------------------------------
1892/01/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 20, 1892)

     After the borough of West Chester decided to extend East
     Nields Street past the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks to the
     borough line at Bolmar Street, a jury awarded damages of
     $300 to A. D. Sharples and $105 to Pennsylvania Railroad.

--------------------------------
1892/04/06     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 6, 1892)

     East Nields Street crossed the Pennsylvania Railroad "Media
     Line" at "an ugly grade crossing" near the engine house. 
     The extension of East Nields Street offered a convenience to
     farmers from southeast of town.

--------------------------------
1892/04/22     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 22, 1892)

     John Ryan worked for Patrick King directing the workmen who
     graded South Franklin Street through King's property.  King
     expected the borough to annex the property and extend South
     Franklin Street in the summer 1892.

--------------------------------
1892/04/29     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 29, 1892).

     Plans were to remove the old tollkeeper's house ("tollgate
     building") at the corner of High and Rosedale to make room
     for the development of Roselyn.

--------------------------------
1892/09/19     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 19, 1892)

     The neighbors on South Franklin Street complained about the
     smell emanating from the fill used to extend East Nields
     Street and/or South Franklin Street.  The author of this
     editorial claimed that the most vile refuse from West
     Chester's alleys was used as fill, including "rotten
     tomatoes, fruit, etc." and "old oyster shells."

--------------------------------
1892/09/30     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 30, 1892)

     The borough of West Chester announced plans to extend South
     Franklin Street to the city line at Rosedale Avenue.  This
     required two bridges over Goose Creek at the intersection of
     South Franklin Street and Linden Street, because the creek
     made an abrupt right-angle turn at that point.

--------------------------------
1893/07/06     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 6, 1893)

     West Chester Streets Commissioner Eachus led an inspection
     of the East Nields Street extension.  At the time, a gang of
     mostly Irish laborers were clearing brush and briars from
     the "jungle" on the Pennsylvania Railroad property.  They
     obtained fill dirt to raise East Nields Street to the level
     of the railroad from an excavation for an alley on property
     owned by P. J. Jefferis, which ran from Matlack to Walnut
     Streets between Nields and Lacy Streets.

--------------------------------
1893/09/12     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 12, 1893)

     The borough of West Chester built a "substantial bridge" on
     East Nields Street over the small creek just east of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad tracks.

--------------------------------
1894/03/05     Editorial in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 5, 1894)

     The lot at the corner of Union Street and South Franklin
     Street was swampy and a potential source of malaria.  The
     author of this editorial urged the city to drain it.

--------------------------------
1894/10/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 5, 1894)

     Water pipes were laid from East Nields Street north along
     South Adams Street for a single square.

--------------------------------
1898      "Oxford resident built first car" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
          (November 13, 1972), 49.  NOTE: Centennial issue nÝ1 of
          5 by the DAILY LOCAL NEWS

     Burton D. Murdaugh (1875-1944) of Oxford built the first
     car, a small gasoline-powered buggy that ran on bicycle
     wheels and chains, in Chester County (pictured) in 1898. 
     Later, he moved to West Chester, married Mary Swayne in
     1906, and fathered two sons, Clem and Joe Murdaugh.  Clem
     later became a national motorcycle champion.

--------------------------------
1898      W. W. Thompson, editor, County Pennsylvania and its
          People (Chicago and New York: The Union History
          Company, 1898), 978.

     Hoopes Brothers & Thomas dealt mostly in fruit and
     ornamental plants.  They began to use mail order and sent
     salesmen all over the country.  In 1898, they had a branch
     office in Nashville, TN; they had 600 acres under
     cultivation, and they employed about 100 people during the
     "packing season" (JJ: probably springtime for ornamentals;
     autumn for fruit).

--------------------------------
1899      "Adventure called first drivers" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
          (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nÝ2
          of 5 by the Daily Local News

     The first automobile owner in West Chester was Joseph H.
     Sager, who bought a Locomobile in New York City for $850 and
     brought it to West Chester in 1899.

--------------------------------
1900      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Keogh's Row was built by Martin
     Keogh about 1900 on the lot bounded by Biddle, Washington,
     Darlington and New Streets. 

--------------------------------
1900      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Two other unnamed "rows" were
     located on Miner Street east of Worthington, and on
     Worthington east of Miner.  They were built around 1900.

--------------------------------
1900      "Owned First `Horseless Carriage' in Chester County" in
          CO-OP REVIEW (March 1938).

     Joseph H. Sager of West Chester bought an 1899 Locomobile in
     New York for $800 and brought it to West Chester a year
     later (about 1900).  He got rid of it shortly thereafter,
     but in 1910, he bought a Ford.

--------------------------------
1900/04/06     "First `Auto' Here" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 6,
               1900).

     D. M. Sharpless brought the first automobile to West
     Chester.  It had a gasoline engine.

--------------------------------
1900/05/14     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 15, 1900).

     The second person to own an automobile in West Chester,
     Harvey M. Hillegass, received a steam-powered machine.

--------------------------------
1900/06/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 27, 1900).

     John Sager of Lenape was in the process of erecting "an
     automobile house at his home."

--------------------------------
1900/06/29     "Automobile Afire" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 29,
               1900).

     Harvey M. Hillegass of South High Street near Miner started
     a fire when he tried to start his automobile this morning. 
     A crowd gathered and offered suggestions, but little damage
     was done.

--------------------------------
1900/07/10     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 11, 1900).

     Harvey M. Hillegass and his wife left on an overland
     automobile trip via Quakertown, Bethlehem and Atlantic City. 
     "The roads are in fine condition for traveling at present .
     . . "

--------------------------------
1900/07/25     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 25, 1900).

     Two West Chester men were constructing automobiles.  One was
     begun by Max Meyer, but sold (unfinished) to some employees
     of the Edison Electric company after Meyer had to return to
     New York.  The other was built by Stephen C. Black.  Both
     had steam engines.

--------------------------------
1900/09/20     "Hilborn Cope's `Auto'" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (September 20, 1900).

     Hilborn Cope had a light automobile operated by a spring
     motor instead of an engine.

--------------------------------
1900?     Elizabeth D. Walter, "A former resident looks back" in
          DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 7, 1970).

     Franklin Darlington, the author's grandfather, was the agent
     for the Adams Express Company.  The author grew up near the
     corner of High and Market Streets.  She remembered the
     Muzante's brothers' fruit stand, as well as other offices
     and neighbors in that part of town.

     "I remember so many of the colored families, that's what I
     prefer to call them, the Gladman's and Spences.  The colored
     families lived mostly in the eastern section which was
     called Georgetown as an old man by the name of John George
     owned most of the properties."

--------------------------------
1900s?    DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Fassnacht's Row had about two dozen
     2-story brick houses on the east side of S. Matlack Street
     south of Union.  They were owned by George Fassnacht, owner
     of a candle and soap factory on West Gay Street.

--------------------------------
1901      Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A HISTORY
          (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes Bros.
          & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
          Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and
          editors, THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh
          and Eighth Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes
          Family Organization, Inc., 1979), 252-253.

     Hoopes Bros. & Thomas opened an office in the Stephen Girard
     Building in Philadelphia.  (JJ: Get a photo or picture of
     the building).  His sales staff served Pennsylvania, New
     Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia; plus parts of New
     York and New England.

--------------------------------
1901/02/21     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February 22, 1901).

     Warren Baldwin and Nathaniel Gillespie of the Edison
     Electric Works unveiled the car that they built.  It drove
     very smoothly up Walnut Street.

--------------------------------
1901/05/31     "A Successful `Auto'" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 31,
               1901).

     Ned Glasby and Warren Baldwin built a successful auto in
     West Chester.  It was powered by steam and operated
     succesfully on muddy roads and hills.

--------------------------------
1901/12/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 17, 1901)

     Fire destroyed the "small one-story frame building on
     Franklin street south of Linden street, occupied for years
     by the late Patrick King and his wife Ellen."  The fire
     broke out at 10pm on 16 December.  An alarm was sounded from
     Box 33 at the corner of Matlack and Lacy Streets, and
     although it was too late to save the house, the Fame Fire
     company got a chance to practice with "its chemical cart."

     Mrs. King had left the previous Saturday for her former home
     in Dublin, Ireland, so she was not at home when the blaze
     broke out.  "It is supposed that the fire was caused by some
     of the boys of the southern portion of town.  Mrs. King had
     her own troubles with them and many of them have been
     previously arrested and fined by the Burgess for molesting
     her."

     The value of the house was estimated at $500 and the value
     of the furnishings at $100.

--------------------------------
1902/01/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 16, 1902)

     A new plank crossing was built at the railroad crossing on
     Franklin Street.

--------------------------------
1902/08/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 5, 1902).

     Several WC car owners planned to take four automobiles to
     Atlantic City.  They included Warren Baldwin, Nathaniel
     Gillespie, Stephen C. Black, Dr. Ernest Pyle and Master
     Bertram Harley.  They expected the trip of 90 miles to take
     about seven hours, without any special speed or effort.  All
     of the cars Burned gasoline and would need no refueling
     during the trip.

--------------------------------
1905      "Adventure called first drivers" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
          (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nÝ2
          of 5 by the Daily Local News

     The first automobile owner in West Chester was Joseph H.
     Sager, who bought a Locomobile in New York City for $850 and
     brought it to West Chester in 1899.

--------------------------------
1905      "Adventure called first drivers" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
          (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nÝ2
          of 5 by the Daily Local News

     Warren Baldwin built an automobile in West Chester by 1901,
     but appears to have done this as an experiemnt, not a
     commercial venture.

--------------------------------
1905      "Adventure called first drivers" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
          (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nÝ2
          of 5 by the Daily Local News

     Burton Murdaugh manufactured a few automobiles between 1899
     and about 1905.

--------------------------------
1906/01/02     "Automobile Notes" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 2,
               1906).

     Philadelphia "autoists" noted that the road to West Chester
     was much improved since last year, thanks to macadam along
     its entire length.

     Dr. C. E. Woodward was the first WC doctor to use an auto.

--------------------------------
1906/01/22     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 22, 1906)

     South Adams Street was unpaved for a half block between
     Market and Miner Streets.  It had no sidewalk at all.

--------------------------------
1906/04/18     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 18, 1906)

     West Chester Streets Commissioner John C. Heed announced
     that improvements would be made to E. Union Street at the
     PRR crossing.  The PRR decided to leave an at-grade
     crossing, so West Chester borough opted to raise the street
     level and pave it.  This was an improvement for the horse
     teams that carried freight away from the PRR freight station
     on E. Union Street.

     The same article mentioned that the East Barnard Street
     "underhead" bridge was not yet finished.

--------------------------------
1907/01/04     "Wilmington Road Bad" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January
               4, 1907).

     Residents complained that High Street was in terrible
     condition for about a half mile below the Normal School. 
     West Goshen Township supervisors promised to macadamize the
     road as soon as weather permits.

--------------------------------
1907/01/29     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 29, 1907).

     Stone for paving the Wilmington Pike below the Normal School
     was obtained from a quarry in "the Dutton woods, just south
     of this place" [West Chester].

--------------------------------
1908/12/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 5, 1908).

     "Despite all the reports that come from other towns to the
     effect that flying machines are being made there, West
     Chester does not seem to be getting the `flying fever' as
     quickly as her sister boroughs.  West Chester was quick to
     recognize the value of the automobile, and has always had
     the reputation for buying her share of these, but she has
     not so far as known a flying machine of any description. . .

     "With Coatesville ahead and Oxford a close second, West
     Chester seems to be content to let those two towns solve the
     problem . . .

     "West Chester has not developed even a disposition to talk
     about flying machines, and so long as this is the case there
     will be nothing doing.  The town seems to be interested in
     who is going to be the next Burgess and what is to be done
     with its sewage than it is in flying machines."

--------------------------------
1909/12/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 24, 1909)

     Burgess P. E. Jefferis offered a prize of $100 to be awarded
     in the summer.  It is not clear from the article, but the
     prize appeared to be offered to neighborhood beautification
     efforts.  Recently, the borough paved the 500 block of South
     Franklin Street with "white oyster shells only."  An unnamed
     resident of who had lived there for 14 years (1895-1909)
     claimed that this was the first time in his memory that the
     city had worked on South Franklin Street, that it was the
     only street in the borough paved white, and that he would
     encourage his neighbors to apply for the prize.

--------------------------------
1910s?    DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  Bread Row was located at Poplar and
     Market Streets.  It was built by John Pyle, the prominent
     confectioner and bread baker on West Gay Street, son of Mrs.
     L. A. W. Pyle.

--------------------------------
1916      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 23, 1955).

     Ralph G. Smith Sr. began his hauling business in West
     Chester in 1916.  He operated the business until 1942 when
     his son, Ralph Jr., took over.  They began as a milk
     transportation and moving company, then branched out into
     general freight, warehousing and horse transportation.  

--------------------------------
1920      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 27, 1945).

     Lewis Hickman Jr. operated a charter bus company from a
     garage located at Franklin and Washington Streets in 1945. 
     He had been in the business of hauling school children since
     1920.  

--------------------------------
1920      Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple,
          1926), 90.

     Later, a covered wooden bridge was constructed at Chadd's
     Ford (date unknown) and in 1920-1921, a concrete bridge was
     built at a cost of about $78,000.

--------------------------------
1923/01/04     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 4, 1923).

     "There are probably more cars of all characters pass the
     corner of High and Gay Streets than any other street corner
     in West Chester and on summer days, especially Sunday, run
     into the thousands.  On several occasions, there have been
     more than two a minute in the middle of the day, and it
     takes careful watching by the traffic officers to avoid
     congestion or accident; yet the streets are generally kept
     open and little delay occurred, except when trolley cars are
     standing at the terminal, or some driver stops at the side
     of the street and carelessly blocks the way."

     There was also discussion of making the central streets one-
     way and eliminating all parking in the center of town.

--------------------------------
1929      Keystone Automobile Club edition of the Blue Book, vol.
          3 (Chicago: Automobile Blue Books, 1929), 164, in CCHS.

     p6 West Chester did not get its own enlarged map section,
     unlike Wilmington, Reading, Chester, Marcus Hook, Bethlehem
     and Allentown.

     p7 The regional map shows West Chester at the center of a
     network of roads leading to Philadelphia (PA Route 5, modern
     PA3), Downingtown (PA 5, modern US322), Longwood (PA 52),
     Lionville & Chadd's Ford (PA62, modern PA100), Phoenixville
     (PA29), (Wilmington (US122, modern US202), Paoli (US122,
     modern Paoli Pike), Unionville (PA842) and Marshallton
     (PA162).

     p134 "West Chester, PA. (Population 11,717)"  "The
     Philadelphia and West Chester Highway connects with the
     Lincoln highway just four miles outside of the town of West
     Chester.  Radiating from the city are good highways north to
     Pottstown and Reading, to Morristown and Valley Forge, and
     south to Wilmington and Baltimore."

     p134 Advertisement for "Mansion House, West Chester,
     Pennsylvania"  "Modern in Every Appointment with Elevator
     Service, Rooms with Bath and Running Water, Grill and Main
     Dining Room, Continuous Service, Managed under Personal
     Supervision of Owner.

--------------------------------
1930/05/05     "Obituary of Sharpless M. Paxson" in DAILY LOCAL
               NEWS, (West Chester: May 5, 1930)

     Sharpless M. Paxson rode a bicycle until he was more than
     eighty years old ... far beyond the normal age to quit.

--------------------------------
1931      "West Chester's Dilemma" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 22,
          1951).

     West Chester had only a single traffic light at the corner
     of High and Gay Streets.  By 1951, there were eight traffic
     lights in town, including the newest at Church and Market
     Streets.

--------------------------------
1931/09/11     "Roaring Oil Blaze Perils Crown Here; Three Are
               Injured" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 12, 1931),
               1 & 10.

     This is the account of the "Goose Creek Fire" which spread
     from East Nields Street to asphalt tanks owned by the
     Bituminous Service Company at East Union Street and the PRR
     crossing.  The fire broke out at 6:50pm and burned for three
     hours.

     Big, bold headlines: "Flames Leap Hundred Feet Into the Air
     When Giant Asphalt Tanks Are Engulfed in Fire at Service
     Company in Southeastern End of Borough; Goose Creek
     Transformed Into Ribbon of Fire When Huge Containers Fall
     From Supports" and "Origin if Fire Undetermined, But
     Believed to Have Been Caused by Discarded Match or
     Cigarette; Flames Play Along Quarter-mile Front, Endangering
     Homes and Property."

     The account is exciting: "Confronted by a roaring fury of
     flames and enveloped in billowing clouds of dense black
     smoke, fear-stricken  householders, property owners and
     volunteer firemen from every end of town and every walk of
     life, battled into submission one of the most spectacular
     and dangerous fires in the history of the borough."

     ". . . the rush and confusion as thousands, in automobiles
     and afoot, converged upon the section threatened by
     impending tragedy."

     It took less than an hour to confine the fire to the
     Bituminous Service Company property, but another two hours
     to put it out.  

     "A match, a cigarette or a spark from a brush fire falling
     on the usually placid waters of Goose Creek, a small stream
     running the length of the eastern end of town, set off the
     conflagratio.  The creek had an hour or so previously being
     (sic) transformed into a stream of oil when two 10,850
     gallon tanks at the Bituminous Company service year, fell
     from the supports and breaking, leaked into the water."

     "Flames shot upward from the creek to a height of fifty feet
     and above these rolled billows of smoke, visible for miles
     around.  Frame houses on Magnolia street and a row of brick
     and frame houses on South Franklin street were seriously
     threatened by the fire.  Sparks also flew across the
     railroad to the coal shed of J. Leon Haggerty, the P. R. R.
     freight station and the lumber yard of Hoffman and Baldwin."

     "The buildings in greatest danger were those along the creek
     on South Franklin street.  Wooden fences bordering the
     stream were set ablaze and the fire worked towards the
     houses with unbelievable rapidity. . . . Sparks, however,
     set fire to the rear kitchen roofs of the homes of Lawrence
     Hamilton, William Montgomery and Nathan Shur."  Nathan Shur
     (506SF) lost a small building at the rear of his house which
     housed 25-30 chickens.  Lawrence Hamilton (Jr) lived at
     (520SF) in the 1970s. 

     The staff at the Atlantic Refining Company kept the fire
     from threatening their installation, and sent for a special
     chemical fire fighting engine from Philadelphia, which
     arrived within an hour.  The borough stables, the Esco
     Cabinet Company, and the PennDOT equipment shed were not
     damaged, but a chicken coop on the Adams property at
     Magnolia Street was reduced to ruins.

     The local companies all responded, but all they could do was
     extinguish the fires along the creek and wait until the
     fires on the creek burned themselves out.  The main fire
     continued out of control until 10:00pm when the Longwood
     Fire Company arrived with an engine that carrying a product
     called "foamite."  It extinguished the fire within minutes.

     Pennsylvania Railroad Passenger Agent J. Walter Keech turned
     off the power to the overhead lines, after the fire melted
     insulation off lines over a siding, and threatened to melt
     the wires, which would have then fallen on the crowd.  Power
     was only cut for about ten minutes, until the fire died down
     near the siding and the insulation stopped burning.  But
     trains from Philadelphia unloaded at Nields Street, and
     passengers from the station took taxis to meet the train. 
     Evidently, each train from Philadelphia normally dropped off
     a car (that continued west?), but since they could not get
     near the station, the extra cars started to get in the way. 
     Finally, a crew pulled six of them past the fire "at a
     snail's pace" to the station.

     "Several airplanes circled above the crowd and took pictures
     of the fire before darkness settled."  After dark, steel
     drums continued to explode with a sound that could be heard
     for a mile in all directions.  Onlookers continued to arrive
     after dark from the outskirts of town.

     William Patton, colored, of 507 SF was cutting wood behimd
     his house and saw it develop from its origin.  "I looked up
     and saw a huge pillar of black smoke.  Down the creek was a
     flood of flame and gas, which rolled up with lightning
     speed.  Boy, it sure was traveling!  In less time than it
     takes to tell the whole creek was blazing while buildings
     nearbu had already begun to smoulder.  Then it reached the
     tanks and soon after blasts began."

     George J. Moses was the West Chester fire chief.

--------------------------------
1931/09/11     "Sidelights on the Big Blaze" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (September 12, 1931), 1.

     ". . . hundreds of men, women, boys and girls, and even
     little children, packed the sidewalks and a solid portion of
     Union street from the intersection with Matlack almost to
     the railroad tracks, within thirty yards of the fire.  They
     watched the hissing fury of the flames with fascinated eyes.

     "Suddenly there was a deep-toned, reverberating "boom" from
     the oil tanks.  A pillar of livid flame leaped several
     hundred feet into the air, rolled over in a billow of
     dripping oil sparks, and swept in a towering wave of heat
     towards the crowd.  A gasp went up from the watchers.  For
     one split second they were motionless.  In that interval,
     someone screamed, and with one accord the mob turned and
     fled.  In the tremendous rush, several people were knocked
     down, and at least one, Mr. Ashton B. T. Smith of 619 West
     Miner Street, was hurt."

--------------------------------
1931/09/11     "Underwriters Test Fortunate for Town" in DAILY
               LOCAL NEWS (September 12, 1931), 1

     The fire insurance underwriters had visited West Chester
     that same afternoon and all of the equipment had been tested
     at Sharples Lake.  Thus, it was primed and ready to go into
     action rapidly by the time the fire broke out.

--------------------------------
1932/03-1935/03     "Murdaugh Cycle Shop," advertisement in WEST
                    CHESTER SESQUICENTENNIAL, 1799-1949,
                    historical booklet (West Chester, 1949), 130,
                    in Chester County Archives, nÝ8D30.

     Clem Murdaugh started to repair motorcycles in his father's
     chicken house, and then worked out of a shop on Cedar Alley
     from March 1932 to March 1925.

--------------------------------
1932/03-1935/03     "Murdaugh Cycle Shop," advertisement in WEST
                    CHESTER SESQUICENTENNIAL, 1799-1949,
                    historical booklet (West Chester, 1949), 130,
                    in Chester County Archives, nÝ8D30.

     Clem Murdaugh started to repair motorcycles in his father's
     chicken house in West Chester, and then worked out of a shop
     on Cedar Alley from March 1932 to March 1935.

--------------------------------
1932/09/08     Coatewville Record (September 8, 1932).

     A permanent injunction was issued by Judge W. Butler Windle
     to keep the Sky Haven Airport from operating.  Plaintiffs
     were William Mirkil, James H. Gay, and the Rush Hospital for
     Consumptives.

     The airport was operated by James B. Jacob on land rented
     from Samuel, Harry and John Taylor.  He received his license
     on November 26, 1929.  He spent several thousand dollars on
     hangars and other airport equipment.

--------------------------------
1935/03-1945   "Murdaugh Cycle Shop," advertisement in WEST
               CHESTER SESQUICENTENNIAL, 1799-1949, historical
               booklet (West Chester, 1949), 130, in Chester
               County Archives, nÝ8D30.

     From March 1935 to the end of World War II, Clem Murdaugh
     repaired motorcycles in a shop located on East Market
     Street.

--------------------------------
1935/03-1945   "Murdaugh Cycle Shop," advertisement in WEST
               CHESTER SESQUICENTENNIAL, 1799-1949, historical
               booklet (West Chester, 1949), 130, in Chester
               County Archives, nÝ8D30.

     From March 1935 to the end of World War II, Clem Murdaugh
     repaired motorcycles in a shop located on East Market Street
     in West Chester.

--------------------------------
1938/01/24     Coatesville Record (January 24, 1938).

     West Chester built its first public parking lot on vacant
     PRR land between Gay and Chestnut Street near Matlack
     Street.  The lot was intended to improve West Chester's
     parking problem "which on Saturday nights becomes acute." 
     Parking was free, and attendants were on duty Saturday
     nights "and other necessary times."  Previously, the land
     had only unused railroad tracks.

--------------------------------
1939/04/20     "West Chester Wins Fight For New highway" in DAILY
               LOCAL NEWS (April 30, 1939).

     For the past five years, the WC Board of Trade and local
     automobile clubs advocated the improvement of the Wilmington
     Pike from West Chester to Painter's Crossroads.  Below that
     point, the State of Delaware had already built a concrete
     road for 15 miles.  When State Senator George B. Scarlett
     got involved, the Highway Department decided to go ahead
     with the work.  It was necessary because the old road
     "remained narrow and badly crowned, and also was made more
     dangerous by sharp curves and steep grades."

--------------------------------
1939/04/25     "`One-Way Streets' Are In Effect Today" in DAILY
               LOCAL NEWS (April 25, 1939).

     For the first time in its history, several of West Chester's
     streets were signposted "one-way" after petitions from
     citizens and examination by transportation experts.  New
     Street ran north, Darlington Street south, and Barnard
     Street west.

--------------------------------
1939/07/11     "Detour Sign Is Placed" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July
               11, 1939).

     During the reconstruction of the Wilminton Pike, traffic was
     detoured from West Chester via Lenape and Chadd's Ford to
     Painter's Crossroads.

--------------------------------
1939/08/31     "Construction Work is Advancing Rapidly, Giving
               Indication That route May Be Available By
               Roosevelt's Advanced Thanksgiving Date" in DAILY
               LOCAL NEWS (August 31, 1939).

     Work was underway to widen and resurface the Wilmington Pike
     between Painter's Crossroads and West Chester.  The new road
     has a concrete surface, wide lanes, and extensive excavation
     to level and straighten it.  It no longer goes through
     Dilworthtown.

--------------------------------
1939/12/02     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 2, 1939).

     The new Wilmington Pike was officially opened in a ceremony
     at Rosedale and High Streets.  The new road cost $284,707. 
     After the ceremony, the two pieces of cellophane tape were
     given to Chris Sanderson.  He planned to keep one for his
     collection and donate the other to the CCHS.

--------------------------------
1940/04/09     "Notice" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 9, 1940).

     The West Chester trucking company, Ralph G. Smith, Inc. was
     incorporated in the state of Pennsylvania.

--------------------------------
1940/08/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 27, 1940).

     Gingrich announced his plans for the airport, which included
     commercial flights, air mail service, flight training, and a
     testing ground for National Guard anti-aircraft
     searchlights.

     The airport should be ready by September 15, 1940.

--------------------------------
1940/09/30     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 30, 1940).

     The federal government announced grants to local
     municipalities to further airport construction.  Gingrich,
     whose private venture to start an airport had not progressed
     beyond ground clearing, stood to receive $623,500 from the
     Civil Aeronautics Board.

--------------------------------
1940/pre-July  DAILY LOCAL NEWS (no date).

     This article described plans to build the West Chester
     Airport in East Goshen on land formerly used for the Sky
     Haven Airport.  Paul Gingrich, a Malvern aviator, bought the
     80-acre tract from WC realtor Harry Taylor on Paoli Pike
     near the intersection with Governor's Road, about four miles
     east of WC.  

     Gingrich, 28, was formerly connected with Malvern Flying
     Services and the Main Line Airport.  He hopes to open the
     airport in September following renovations.

     Gingrich announded his plan to train pilots in accordance
     with the Federal Government's emergency defence program.  A
     few months ago, the WC State Teacher's College began
     offering elementary aeronautics courses.  The college was
     interested in Gingrich's plans but had made no commitment. 
     Vilanova already has a joint program with the Main Line
     Airport.

     The old Sky Haven Airport, operated by John [sic; real name
     was James] D. Jacob, closed about five years ago after local
     landowners William Mirkil and James H. Gay had it declared a
     public nuisance, citing noise, dust, crowds, and stunting.

     Governor's Road was also known as Sproul Road or Route 352.

     Gingrich graduated from WCHS in 1930.

--------------------------------
1941/01/31     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 31, 1941).

     The intersection at Painter's Crossroads will receive a
     traffic light.  For the past number of years, an officer of
     the Keystone Automobile Club supervised traffic at the
     intersection during peak hours.

--------------------------------
1942      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 23, 1955).

     In 1942, Ralph G. Smith Jr. took over his father's hauling
     business.  They began as a milk transportation and moving
     company, then branched out into general freight, warehousing
     and horse transportation.  

--------------------------------
1942  (Philadelphia: R. L. Polk & Co., Inc., Publishers, 1942),
     259.

     The Short Line Incorporated of Pennsylvania had its division
     office at 212 W. Market Street and its terminal at the
     corner of Gay and High Street.  (See photocopy of advert.)

--------------------------------
1944/06/03     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 3, 1944).

     "The Bus Center" was located at the intersection of High and
     Gay Streets.  It offered information and tickets for
     virtually all destinations in the USA.  It was served by the
     following companies: the Short Line, Main Line Transfer
     company (Malvern, Paoli, Berwyn, Devon, Stafford, Wayne and
     Norristown), the Brandywine Transit Company (twice a day to
     Marhsallton, Embreeville, Mortonville), and the trolley for
     69th Street in Philadelphia.  

     There is also a Western Union office, a "first class lunch
     counter."  The Bus Center is open from 06h30 to 24h00 daily.

--------------------------------
1944/07/17     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 17, 1944)

     Greenfield Park was built on land donated to the borough by
     realtor Harry F. Taylor, on the condition that it was named
     after the prominent local family.  The article mentioned
     that Greenfield Park stood at the edge of the Riggtown
     section, which contained many children.

--------------------------------
1944/08/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 5, 1944)

     Greenfield Park required many loads of fill in the swampy
     area around Goose Creek.  A local resident, Joseph Cotter,
     supervised the placement of truckloads of fill.  He
     constructed a small shack for his own use at the site, and
     marked it with a sign to "Keep Out" to deter local vandals.

--------------------------------
1945/02/17     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February 17, 1945)

     Joseph Carter supervised the grading and distribution of
     fill in the "Riggins Lot" just south of Goose Creek.  There
     were plans to build a cannery there to supplement the
     cannery already in operation along the railway in
     Willistown.  The fill came from rubbish collections in the
     neighborhoods adjoining Goose Creek.

--------------------------------
1945/10/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 27, 1945).

     Lewis Hickman Jr. operated a charter bus company from a
     garage located at Franklin and Washington Streets in 1945. 
     He had been in the business of hauling school children since
     1920.  In 1945, he employed 18 drivers, both men and women.

--------------------------------
1945-1947      "Murdaugh Cycle Shop," advertisement in WEST
               CHESTER SESQUICENTENNIAL, 1799-1949, historical
               booklet (West Chester, 1949), 130, in Chester
               County Archives, nÝ8D30.

     In 1945, Clem Murdaugh moved his motorcycle repair shop to
     114-116 E. Gay Street.  In 1946 and 1947, he won the US
     National Expert Hill Climb Championship.

--------------------------------
1945-1947      "Murdaugh Cycle Shop," advertisement in WEST
               CHESTER SESQUICENTENNIAL, 1799-1949, historical
               booklet (West Chester, 1949), 130, in Chester
               County Archives, nÝ8D30.

     In 1945, Clem Murdaugh moved his motorcycle repair shop to
     114-116 E. Gay Street in West Chester.  In 1946 and 1947, he
     won the US National Expert Hill Climb Championship.

--------------------------------
1946/12/24     "Notice" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 24, 1946).

     The company of Ralph G. Smith, Inc. registered its name with
     the state of Pennsylvania.  Its owner was Ralph G. Smith Jr.
     of 206 N. Penn Street and its principal place of business
     was 239 E. Market Street.

--------------------------------
1947/08/23     "40 More Parking Meters To Be Installed Shortly"
               in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 23, 1947).

     391 parking meters were installed on West Chester streets in
     April 1946.  40 more meters were authorized in August 1947
     along West Chestnut between High and church, South
     Darlington from Market to Wollerton, West Market west of
     Darlington halfway to New Streets.  They were installed
     after August 23, since "work is expected to begin shortly on
     installation."

--------------------------------
1947/10/02     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 2, 1947).

     Installation of 40 new parking meters in West Chester began
     today.  This article mentions that the Short Line Bus Garage
     was located on West Market Street halfway between Darlington
     and New Streets.

--------------------------------
1947/10/30     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 23, 1947).

     The installation of "Wait-Walk" signs at High and Gay
     Streets was completed today.

--------------------------------
1948/12/30     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 30, 1948).

     Several weeks ago, "Walk-Don't Walk" signs were placed at
     the corner of High and Gay Streets.  However, they were
     largely ignored by pedestrians.

--------------------------------
1949/08/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 24, 1949).

     Charles E. Lucas Jr., president of the Automobile Club of
     Chester County, spoke to the West Chester Lions Club about
     the problems creating traffic congestion in West Chester. 
     Five major highways converged on the intersections of High &
     Gay or High & Marshall, and the completion of a superhighway
     on the Delmarva peninsula promised to funnel more traffic
     into West Chester.  The borough had already abolished left-
     hand turns, with some improvement, but Lucas thought a
     bypass for through traffic was the answer.  He also
     recommended parking lots to take cars of the streets.

--------------------------------
1950/08/01     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 1, 1950),in CCHS clipping
               file: "West Chester Streets: "1950."

     The West Chester borough secretary, John Groff, announced
     plans to pave two blocks of West Market Street to Bradford
     Avenue, and one block of South Brandywine Street between
     Miner and Market.  As a result, West Miner Street will
     extend an additional block west. Prior to this, the streets
     were not paved at all.

--------------------------------
1950/08/12     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 12, 1950).

     Fifteen of 25 West Chester borough street workers went on
     strike for a 10 cents/hour wage increase over the 95
     cents/hour they earned at present.  They were employed on
     the West Market Street improvement project.

--------------------------------
1950/08/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 16, 1950).

     West Chester borough street workers returned to work after
     receiving a five cents/hour wage increase.  The increase was
     awarded to all borough employees.  Since the men worked a
     fifty-hour week, this raised their wages by a total of $2.50

--------------------------------
1950/08/29     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 29, 1950).

     West Chester's "Merry-go-round" traffic pattern was
     scheduled to end.  It began as an alternative to left turns
     that blocked major intersections, but it often required
     vehicles to pass through the same intersection twice as they
     went around the block.  Foreign motorists complained., and
     it increased the overall amount of traffic in the borough.

--------------------------------
1951/06/22     "West Chester's Dilemma" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June
               22, 1951).

     West Chester had only a single traffic light at the corner
     of High and Gay Streets.  By 1951, there were eight traffic
     lights in town, including the newest at Church and Market
     Streets.

--------------------------------
1952/04/30     "Meeting a Real Need" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April
               30, 1952).

     West Chester opened a new parking lot on High Street between
     Market and Miner Streets.

--------------------------------
1952/06/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 20, 1952).

     A majority of the 24 employees of the West Chester borough
     Streets Department went on strike for a 15-cents/hour pay
     increase.  Only five stayed on the job.  They earn
     $1.10/hour at present and work 50 hours/week on a 5 1/2 day
     schedule.  They received no sick days; only $15/week after
     their eighth day off sick.  They also received no pay on
     days that they missed work.

--------------------------------
1952/06/23     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 23, 1952).

     The striking West Chester Streets Department workers
     returned to work rather than lose their jobs.  They received
     no pay increase.

--------------------------------
1952/07/26     "Four New One-Way Streets Established in West
               Chester" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 26, 1952).

     Magnolia, Lacey, Nields, and Linden Streets were made one-
     way, and parking was extended to both sides of each street. 
     Nields and Magnolia ran westbound; the others ran eastbound.

--------------------------------
1952/08/26     "Speeding Car Rips Porch of Rosedale Avenue Home"
               in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 26, 1952).

     A car operated by 23 year-old Harlan Jones of 508 South
     Franklin Street plowed into the front porch of Mrs. Maude
     Sterling at 801 South Matlack Street around 12:35am this
     morning.  He was accompanied by a young woman who fled the
     scene and was not identified.  The house was badly damaged
     by the accident.

     The Sterling house was known locally as the "old Pratt
     house" for William Pratt, whose 1902 conviction of his
     wife's murder was overturned on retrial.

--------------------------------
1952/11/26     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 26, 1952).

     Borough council awarded a contract to synchronize traffic
     lights in West Chester.  Traffic will roll at 20 mph.

--------------------------------
1953/03/12     Tom Rettew, writing in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March
               12, 1953).

     Construction of the new WC bypass will begin this week.

--------------------------------
1953/07/16     "Lost Forever: The Charm of Our Northern Approach"
               in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 16, 1953).

     This writer complained that the cloverleaf connecting Rt100
     to the new bypass destroyed "the borough's most beautiful
     approach, North High Street, by way of Gilbert's mill and
     the West Chester Golf and Country Club."  

     "It was a pity to see a landmark such as Gilbert's Mill
     leveled but to witness the chopping and felling of dozens of
     beautiful sycamore trees that lined the approach to the
     borough has sickened every resident who passed that way. 
     Planted by the West Chester Garden Club and Town Planning
     Council in 1928 through public subscription in which the
     school children had a part, it took those trees 25 years to
     attain their present size and beauty."

     "The damages has ben done.  Never again will those trees
     shade the traveler as he nears West Chester.

--------------------------------
1953/09/14     Photo caption in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 15,
               1953).

     The Short Line Bus Company, which provided transportation
     for students at West Goshen Consolidated School, went on
     strike.  The school was located on Rt202, and when parents
     showed up in cars to retrieve their children, traffic
     congestion ensued despite the efforts of a West Goshen
     policeman to direct traffic.  School attendance was reported
     at 92% of normal.

--------------------------------
1954/02/13     "Traffic and Buses" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February
               13, 1954).

     The Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Company recently
     petitioned the state PUC to replace its trolley line on PA3
     between West Chester and Philadelphia with buses.  At this
     point, Gay and Market Streets were both still two-ways.

--------------------------------
1954/04/19     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 19, 1954)

     The West Chester Borough extended East Nields Street from
     Adams Street to the borough line at Bolmar Street.

--------------------------------
1954/05/01     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 1, 1954).

     West Chester had five municipal parking lots.

--------------------------------
1954/10/11     "Facts and Figures Concerning New West Chester By-
               Pass" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 11, 1954).

     Opening date: October 13, 1954
Cost: $4,058,716
Number of working days: 270
Length: 5 miles (main road); 6.9 miles (all construction)
Width:24 feet on two-lane stretches; 66 feet on four lane
portions of US202
Concrete: 15,483 cubic yards
Guard rail: 40,000 feet

--------------------------------
1954/10/13     Tom Rettew, "Borough By-Pass Is Reading For
               Traffic Following Ceremony" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (October 13, 1954).

     Traffic began to use the new West Chester bypass today.  The
     bypass, 6.9 miles in length, cost $4 million.  Opening
     ceremonies were held at the Route 3 interchange, and
     featured the WCHS band directed by Joseph Hanselman.  Ex-
     burgess Cornwall G. Gibbons was the emcee.  Other guests
     included Miss Pennsylvania Barbara Sue Nagy, Burgess Henry
     V. DeHaven, various state oficials, and about 200 people.

--------------------------------
1954/10/21     Tom Rettew, "Wide Open Spaces" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (October 21, 1954).

     Although the new WC bypass has been open for a week, traffic
     is still light.  Local policeman blamed it on the absence of
     signs indicating that the bypass led to RTs. 202, 29, etc.

--------------------------------
1955/01/23     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 23, 1955).

     Ralph G. Smith, Inc. was a milk transportation and moving
     company, which branched out into general freight,
     warehousing and horse transportation.  In 1955, the company
     owned a warehouse at 239 E. Market Street, 20 tractors and
     18 trailers.  It operated as a horse carrier in 32 states
     east of the Mississippi, and as a household goods mover in
     14 states.

--------------------------------
1955/10/04     "Plenty of Easy Parking For Shoppers" in DAILY
               LOCAL NEWS (October 4, 1955).

     The borough had 467 parking meters and five parking lots
     with a total of 389 spaces.  The six lots were located on
     Walnut between Gay & Chestnut, on High between Market &
     Miner, on High between Barnard & Miner, on W. Market between
     New & Darlington, and on Gay just west of New Street.

--------------------------------
1956/04/19     Photo caption in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 19,
               1956).

     A truck hauling 17 tons of 2.5 inch stone operated by
     Pershing Perkins, aged 35, of Downingtown RD2, dropped its
     load on Rt. 100 north of WC.  No one was hurt, but damage to
     the truck, owned by John Trego, was $1000.

--------------------------------
1956/05/16     "Union And Barnard Sts., Between New, Matlack, Are
               Now One Way" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 16, 1956).

     Union Street was made one-way eastbound and Barnard Street
     one-way westbound between Matlack and New Streets.

--------------------------------
1956/08/03     Bill Hall, writing in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 3,
               1956).

     Work began on the extension of the WC Bypass to Route 322. 
     It required the construction of a mile of 72-foot highway
     from North New Street to Route 322.  The cost was $200,000.

     The original bypass opened on October 13, 1954.  It began on
     US202 one mile south of WC and "looped gracefully around the
     east of the borough, arched across the north, and then with
     shocking suddeness condensed into a 16-foot wide, high
     crowned, bumpy country road."

--------------------------------
1956/11/17     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 17, 1956).

     West Chester began to use little red "Fine-O-Meters" on
     Monday, which allowed people to pay their parking fines
     without "slinking" into the police station.  The fine for
     overtime parking was $1.00.  The new boxes were installed on
     both sides of every street where there were parking meters.

--------------------------------
1957/12/27     Coatesville Record (December 12, 1957).

     A survey by the Civil Aeronautics Administration showed that
     there were 61,856 private airplanes in America, and 63 in
     Chester County, or 1 per 2880 people.

--------------------------------
1958      DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 12, 1948).

     This article names several "rows" of houses in West Chester
     and gives their origin.  "Cabbage Row" was located on E.
     Chestnut Street just east of "Lumber St." (aka Railroad
     Street; west of Franklin Street near the PRR-Frazer
     railyard).  It was built by Stephen G. Snare, a tailor, and
     consisted of 10 three-story houses.  It was built about
     1858.

--------------------------------
1958/03   Keystone Motorist (March 1958).

     A number of road improvement projects were approved
     following the passage of the federal highway bill in 1956. 
     One project was for widening US 202 from south of West
     Chester to the Delaware State Line at a cost of $2,098,447. 
     The new road will have four lanes and improved overpasses
     and intersections to make it a high speed link between the
     PA turnpike, US Route 1, and US40.

--------------------------------
1958/03/11     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 11, 1958).

     The Jay Julian Company of Elsmere, DE got the bid to widen
     US202 from the Delaware state line to West Chester.  The new
     road was 48 feet wide, replacing the old road, which was
     only 22 feet wide.

--------------------------------
1960/01/21     Photo caption in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 21,
               1960.in CCHS clipping file: "Transportation,
               Automobiles."

     The new PA driver's exam center will open next Monday in
     West Goshen on Bolmar Street just east of West Chester.

--------------------------------
1961/06/22     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 22, 1961).

     For the first time in its history, Ralph G. Smith Inc. moved
     an elephant.  Driver Ernest Wynn hauled Ambika, a gift of
     the children of India to the children of the USA, on a tour
     of schools in eastern cities, including Allentown,
     Philadelphia, and Washington DC.  She will remain in the
     Washington Zoo now that the tour is ended.

--------------------------------
1961/11/23     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 22, 1961).

     Gay and Market Streets became one-way streets on November
     23, 1961.  New Street and Darlington Streets remained one-
     way, but switched directions.

--------------------------------
1962/01/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 24, 1962).

     A new project was about to begin to relocate and widen US202
     for 15.41 miles in Chester County, between the turnpike and
     the West Chester bypass.  [JJ: The bypass already existed in
     1962.  A photo dated 1958/09/30 claimed to have been taken
     from the bypass looking down on repaving operaitons along
     Rt. 202.

--------------------------------
1962/03/03     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 3, 1962).

     The new US202 will have nine interchanges between the WC
     bypass and Wilson road, south of the turnpike.  It will also
     have four 12-foot lanes and a 40-foot medial strip.

--------------------------------
1962/04/26     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 26, 1962).

     Numerous one-way streets had their directions changed,
     including Nields (west to east), Magnolia, Linden, and
     Lacey.  [JJ: They ended up running in their present (1997)
     directions.]

--------------------------------
1964/04/07     George Brice, writing in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (April 7, 1964).

     Vandals torched a 1936-vintage horse-moving van belonging to
     the Ralph G. Smith trucking firm last Monday, at the
     company's storage facility on S. Franklin Street.  The
     article described the company as "the nation's oldest horse
     transportation firm."

     Ralph Smith Sr. founded the business in 1916.  His father,
     Gunkle W. Smith, hauled goods by horse and wagon.  His
     grandfather once ran a taxi service.

--------------------------------
1965/01/26     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 26, 1965).

     The firm of A. Duie Pyle was founded in Coatesville in April
     1924.  In 1965, it had its main office in West Chester, and
     terminals in Coatesville, West Chester, Morrisville NJ,
     Sparrows Point MD and Buffalo NY.  It operated radio-
     dispatched trucks throughout the northeast, specializing in
     steel hauling and household moving.

--------------------------------
1971/05/10     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 10, 1971).

     Seven or eight employees of A. Duie Pyle's household moving
     division, all members of the Teamsters, went on strike to
     protest the closing of the division.  The company retained
     its freight operation.

--------------------------------
1983/08/22     Marshall L. Jones, "Editor's News" in DAILY LOCAL
               NEWS (August 22, 1983).

     Burton Murdaugh of Oxford built the first auto in Chester
     County.  Later, he moved to West Chester to work for the
     Bell Telephone Company, and his sons Joe and Clem became
     known as local jalopy drivers.  They raced at the Brandywine
     Fairgrounds on Wilmington Pike south of West Chester.  The
     fair ceased operations in 1926, but the races continued on
     the dirt track.  Later, Clem became a national motorcycle
     hill climb champion.

--------------------------------
1987/03/22     Gretchen Metz, "On Wings of Memory" in Sunday
               Local News (March 22, 1987).

     This reporter interviewed several pioneering aviators from
     the area including Marshall Jones, Eddie Miller, Luis CLose,
     Millie Albertson, John Garzia, Katen Macario and Helen Jones
     Stapleton.

--------------------------------
1997/07/31     Kyle Ashinhurst, "Pilots taking possession of
               airport in West Goshen" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July
               31, 1997), A3.

     56 local pilots, organized as the "New Brandywine Airport
     Club," purchased the Brandywine Airport from its owner, Bill
     Wilson, for $2.15 million.  The airport serves about 80
     planes, including both private planes and corporate jets. 
     It is one of only three remaining private airports in
     Chester County, along with the Chester County airport near
     Coatesville and the Newgarden Airport near Toughkennamon.

     The article mentioned Bill Moran, the airport board
     chairman, and Linda Robinson, a pilot and flight instructor.

--------------------------------
1996      "Trucking" in WEST CHESTER AND NEARBY COMMUNITIES (Bell
          Atlantic, 1996-1997), 448.

     The phone book "Yellow Pages" list the following trucking
     firms with West Chester addresses: the American Truck Lines,
     DeMaio Transportation, Glennon's Milk Service, Grannetino
     Trucking, Montgomery Tank Lines and Volunteer Express, Inc.

      
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