CHESTER COUNTY FACTS: railroads


This file contains assorted facts from Chester County history collected by students in the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

This file has not been completely proofread, nor have the sources been verified, so use this material with caution.

Collected by Jim Jones, David Flogaus, Kelly Kulp-Bosler, Mike Wolford and Bob Gialanella (Spring 1995). Last edited by Jim Jones (Summer 1995).


Return to the Riggtown Home Page.
1810/04/26     Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, INDEX TO
               FAMILIES AND PERSONS, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY,
               PENNSYLVANIA: WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL
               SKETCHES (Danbury, PA: Richard T. and Mildred
               Williams, 1971), 226.

     Philip P. Sharples was born on April 26, 1810.  He resided
     in West Chester for many years and was prominently connected
     with our first Railroad.  He was the father of Stephen P.
     Sharples of Boston, Mass., the state assayer of Mass.

-----------------------------------------
1811/00/00     Source: McPherson, James Alan, and Miller
               Williams, eds.  RAILROAD: TRAINS AND TRAIN PEOPLE
               IN AMERICAN CULTURE. New York: Random House, 1976.
               p3-4.  

     In 1811, the Erie Canal Commission said no to the
     construction of a railroad even though it would have been
     cheaper, and more efficient.

-----------------------------------------
1820 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     During the period 1820-1833, a large horse wagon freighting
     and passenger business existed between Philadelphia and
     Pittsburgh.  A line of four stages ran through Chester
     County along the Lancaster Pike.

-----------------------------------------
1827 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
     COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES,
     Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p359

     In 1827, the Legislature authorized canal commissioners to
     make examinations through Chester and Lancaster Counties for
     a railroad to connect with the Pennsylvania Canal.  In 1828,
     these commissioners were directed to locate and put under
     contract a railroad through Chester County via Lancaster to
     Columbia.

-----------------------------------------
1830/12/22     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A second public meeting was held on Dec. 22, 1830 to discuss
     the possibility of building a railroad to West Chester. 
     Joseph Wilson was appointed engineer to investigate
     possibilities.  Judge Izaak Darlington presided at both
     meetings.

-----------------------------------------
1830/12/11     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A public meeting was held at the Turk's Head Hotel on Dec.
     11, 1830 concerning the building of West Chester's first
     railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1830 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37

     The plans to build the West Chester Railroad led to the
     construction of Price's Boarding School for young ladies in
     1830.  By 1857, it was flourishing under Misses Evans.  It 

-----------------------------------------
1830/12/24     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On December 24, 1830, a third public meeting concerning a
     West Chester railroad link resolved to construct a railway
     from WC to intersect with the Columbia Railway line, and
     chose Dr. William Darlington to head the local committee.

-----------------------------------------
1831 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     The Philadelphia and Reading Railroad was organized in 1831.

-----------------------------------------
1831/01/08     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On January 8, 1831, John (or Joseph) Wilson presented a
     satisfactory route approved by the committee.  The estimated
     cost was $88, 021.29  A charter was obtained on July 18
     1831.  It was the first rr charter granted by the state
     which was carried into effect.

-----------------------------------------
1831/03/28     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 2, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On the 28 March, 1831, a board of directors was elected for
     the West Chester Railroad.  John (or Joseph) Wilson was
     appointed the chief engineer.  By May 26, the contracts were
     let for grading the surface in mile-length sections.

-----------------------------------------
1831-1832 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
          WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY
          OF THE BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT
          TIME.. . (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers,
          E.F. James, printer, 1857, 37.

     "Among the causes which, about this time, began to impart
     additional animation and vital energy to the Borough, was
     the construction of the West Chester Railroad (9 miles in
     length), in the years 1831-32."  The track was constructed
     of yellow pine pieces, plated with flat iron bars.  The
     motive power was horsepower.  

-----------------------------------------
1832 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1832, a railway spur was constructed from West Chester to
     Malvern, using yellow pine rails placed on stone sleepers.

-----------------------------------------
1832 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME (West
     Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James, printer,
     1857, 37

     The plans to build the West Chester Railroad also stimulated
     the construction of the spacious Hotel, or Mansion House in
     1832 by Wm. Everhart, Esq, at the southeast corner of Market
     & Church Streets.

-----------------------------------------
1832 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     John P. Baily, Esq. was in charge of the West Chester
     Railroad.  It was the first work of its kind completed in
     Pennsylvania.  It was finished on time and within the
     estimated cost.

-----------------------------------------
1832/09/18     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 2, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     At a board meeting on Sept. 18, 1832, it was announced by
     John Baily that the entire nine-mile track would be
     completed within sixteen months.

-----------------------------------------
1833 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The first railroad was completed from Columbia to
     Philadelphia in 1833 using horses for motive power.  

-----------------------------------------
1833/10/18     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 4, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The first track superintendent was J. Lacey Darlington, who
     was paid $1.00 daily.

     On Oct. 18, 1833, the PA Canal Commission completed a
     railroad line to the head of the inclined planes, located
     four miles from Philadelphia on the other side of the
     Schulkyll.  Passengers were conveyed the rest of the way by
     stages.

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1834, the first English-made locomotive was placed in
     service on the railway spur that connected West Chester to
     Malvern.

-----------------------------------------
1834/07   Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
          CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
          January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester University
          special collections.

     In July of 1834, William Sharpless was appointed the
     Superintendent for the West Chester Railroad.  He lived in
     Philadelphia, because the company built a hotel on Broad
     Street south of Race Street.  Called the West Chester House,
     it housed the company cars and was the depot for freighting
     done to West Chester.  Sharpless had large warehouses built.

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
     COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES,
     Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p360   
     
     The Columbia Railroad began operating in February 1834 from
     Columbia, Pennsylvania on the Susquehanna River to
     Philadelphia.

-----------------------------------------
1834/01/01     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The West Chester Railroad declared its first dividend on the
     first of January, 1834.  The dividend was 3%.  Future
     prospects looked good at this point.  

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     1834 the West Chester Railroad built a connecting road from
     Kirkland Station across to Whiteland to reach the limestone
     and marble quarries (JJ: possibly Boot Road between PA100
     and US202).  The next year, marble from the Thomas quarry
     was available for the front of the Chester County Bank. 
     This road proved a financial loss, however.

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 39.

     The veteran teacher Joshua Hoopes opened the Boarding and
     Day School in West Chester in 1834.

-----------------------------------------
1837 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The Chester County Bank lost half of its capital in the
     general crash of 1837.  As a consequence, the West Chester
     Railroad suffered major losses and fell heavily in debt.

-----------------------------------------
1839 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     No dividends were paid to West Chester Railroad stockholders
     during 1839.  The stockholders were not happy.  The West
     Chester Railroad did receive some breaks from the state on
     toll rates for use on the Columbia Road.  The directors were
     apparently maligned by the Directors.  Since its inception,
     the West Chester Railroad paid the state $30, 000 in tolls.

-----------------------------------------
1840 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1840, the West Chester Railroad considered creating a
     more direct line, but thought it was too expensive.

-----------------------------------------
1841 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1841, William Sharples resigned as Superintendent.  The
     directors assumed all the duties of the former paid staff,
     without fee.

-----------------------------------------
1842 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1842, expenses were reduced from the previous year $2400,
     but income on the WCRR dropped $2900.  The condition of the
     track was so bad that it needed to be relaid.  The directors
     authorized the purchase of 600 hundred ton of T-rails, but
     they only bought 40 tons before they ran out of money.

-----------------------------------------
1844/mid..rr.mod.   Source: the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
                    January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
                    University special collections.

     Second half of 1844, the Executive Committee of the West
     Chester Railroad recommended reconstruction of the road with
     the same kind of rails as before. It would cost $15, 000.

-----------------------------------------
1844/01/15     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     At the annual meeting of the West Chester Railroad directors
     on January 15, 1844, a new board of directors appointed
     Philip P. Sharples and Dr. Isaac Thomas as an executive
     committee.  Sharples become obsessed by railroad matters.

-----------------------------------------
1844/01/31     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     1/31/1844, the Executive Committee of Philip P. Sharples and
     Dr. Isaac Thomas as an executive appointed Samuel M. Penten
     as the superintendent of the West Chester Railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1844/05/25     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     An agreement was reached with Canal Commission for a rate of
     $15 a train for running from the West Chester intersection
     of the Columbia-Philadelphia Railroad to the inclined plane. 
     It started operating on 5/25/1844.  Two second-hand 8-
     wheeled passenger cars were bought for service.  Then two
     new cars were commissioned from the W.E. Allison Company. 
     The baggage on these cars was carried beneath the seat.

-----------------------------------------
1845 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     Steam power was introduced on the West Chester Railroad in
     1845, which crushed the wooden track by 1849.  Iron edge
     rails were substituted starting in this year.  This made it
     a substantial track.   The West Chester Railroad connected
     West Chester with Philadelphia.  

-----------------------------------------
1845/05/26     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On May 26, 1845, the Canal Commission agreed to haul West
     Chester Railroad trains for only $6000 annually.  (JJ: that
     is 400 trains at the 1844 rate.  Was it actually an
     increase?  Was it due to the introduction of steam
     locomotives?)  Philip Sharples reported completed contracts
     for relaying for the junction from West Chester to the
     junction.  

-----------------------------------------
1846/01/19     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On January 19, 1846, Philip Sharples declined re-election as
     Superintendent of the West Chester Railroad, because his
     private affairs requiring more of his personal attention.

-----------------------------------------
1846/04/28     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On April 28, 1846, Philip D. Thomas appointed Superintendent
     of the West Chester Railroad.  There was already evidence
     that the new locomotives were destroying the light iron
     track.

-----------------------------------------
1847 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The Directors of the West Chester Railroad proposed to
     construct heavier track.  Stockholders agreed to a further
     mortgage of $15, 000 to secure the funds for this purpose. 
     Philip Sharples was again elected a Director.  Directors and
     officers of the road with friends raised $ to purchase new
     rails.  In 1847 the stronger track was rebuilt.  The debt
     was paid from profits in 2 years.  (Not true MW)

-----------------------------------------
1849 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     Steam power was introduced on the West Chester Railroad in
     1845, but the locomotives crushed the wooden track by 1849,
     so iron edge rails were substituted.

-----------------------------------------
1850s     Source: James D. Lynch, Jr., THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8
          (Bryn Mawr, PA: Philadelphia Chapter, PRR T & HS,
          1988), 3.

     A second railroad was built in West Chester to get around
     paying high tariffs, due to the high debt of the State's
     railroad; thus, the West Chester and Philadelphia was born.

-----------------------------------------
1850/10/14     Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY
               OF CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
               BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Philadelphia: Louis H.
               Everts, 1881) p360  
     
     John J. Parker, in some reminiscences published in the Daily
     Local News of May 24, 1879, states that in 1850, after the
     completion of the branch to West Philadelphia which avoided
     the inclined plane, the West Chester passengers were
     conveyed by this route to Philadelphia.  The first train of
     cars with passengers crossed the Philadelphia Market Street
     bridge on Oct. 14, 1850, with Philip P. Sharpless (note
     spelling M.W.), of West Chester, then superintendent of the
     'old road' in charge.

     Three passenger trains ran on the Columbia Railroad - 1)
     fast line - west every morning, 2) slow line - west every
     afternoon, and 3) nightime - west in the evening.

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 38.

     The proposal to build a second railroad was animated by the
     belief that Philadelphia might be made a first rate place if
     not so far from West Chester.  

     "In the age of Progress and annexation, we all go
     incontinently for the annihilation of time and monopoly of
     space."  - the author

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The two West Chester railroads clashed.  The owners of the
     old road, finding their property value increasing, refused
     to join with the new road.  They warned potential investors
     in the other railroad, that they could lose all of their
     money.  A violent newspaper war ensued between the friends
     of the two lines.  

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The proponents of the West Chester-Media-Philadelphia
     Railroad wanted to avoid the Canal Commission charges for
     the use of the inclined plane west of Philadelphia.  They
     decided the cost would be one million dollars.
     A new generation of professional men, some enemies of the
     old West Chester Railroad, and businessmen from Delaware
     County organized to build a "West Chester and Philadelphia
     Railroad.  

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1851, the state finished grading tracks that took the
     Columbia line directly into Philadelphia.  The line ran on
     bridge to Market Street and then to Broad Street.  A depot
     for passengers and freight on the southwest corner of Broad
     and Market Streets.

-----------------------------------------
1851-1857 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
          WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY
          OF THE BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT
          TIME.. . (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers,
          E.F. James, printer, 1857, 38.

     In 1851 a direct "road" (Railroad) to Philadelphia along a
     southern route by way of Media was begun.  The undertaking
     proved expensive and arduous.  It was being managed in the
     style and spirit which presided over the birth of the town,
     when all was "Harmony, not understood."  (JJ: Does this mean
     that the work was disorganized?)  The work was not completed
     until 1857.

-----------------------------------------
1850s     Source: Sharpless Alfred,  "A History of Railroading in
          Chester County" (Daily Local News, 1898/01/20), 8.

     A second railroad was built to West Chester.  The owners of
     the old railroad was slow due to the inclined plane that was
     used near Philadelphia.  A second line was developed by Mr.
     Edward Gay, a prominent engineer, at a estimated cost of
     $768,829.03.

-----------------------------------------
1857/08/01     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The Pennsylvania Company bought the rights to the state
     railroads and canals at auction on August 1, 1857.

-----------------------------------------
1857 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 87., 

     Philip P. Sharples was the superintendent of the West
     Chester Railroad in 1857.  He lived at 82 S. Church Street
     in West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1857 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 39.

     The author expressed the fear that Philadelphia might soon
     engulf West Chester as a result of railroad construction.

-----------------------------------------
1857 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 105.

     The schedule of the old West Chester Railroad, taken from
     LINES OF TRAVEL - ADVERTISEMENT.  Trains left the West
     Chester depot at 47 East Gay Street at 7:30 A.M., and at
     3:00 P.M.  The fare was 75 cents.  Officers of the railroad:
     President - Joseph L. Lewis; Secretary & Treasurer - S.M.
     Painter; Superintendent - Philip P. Sharples.

-----------------------------------------
1858      Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF
          CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
          BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Philadelphia: Louis H.
          Everts, 1881)  p359 

     The West Chester Railroad Company was subjected to unjust
     and oppressive regulations, according to officials of the
     first West Chester Railroad.  These helped cause the
     formation of a company for construction of an independent
     line by way of Media.  In 1858 the old line was leased by
     the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.

-----------------------------------------
1858 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The second West Chester Railroad (via Media) did not reach
     West Chester as planned in 1858.  The old line continued to
     make money.

-----------------------------------------
1858/11/10     Source: Lynch, James D. JR.  "The High Line".  Vol
               8, Bryn Mawr, PA: Philadelphia Chapter, PRR T &
               HS. 1988, p5.

     1858/11/10, the West Chester branch opened, completing the
     West Chester Railroad .

-----------------------------------------
1858/11/11     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1857, the Pennsylvania Railroad took over the operation
     of the railway line between West Chester and Malvern, and
     the first train reached West Chester from Philadelphia via
     Media on 11 November 1858.

-----------------------------------------
1859/04/06     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A five year agreement between the West Chester Railroad and
     the Pennsylvania Railroad began on April 6, 1859.  The PARR
     took possession of the line and agreed to run the trains on
     satisfactory terms.  The West Chester Railroad claimed that
     the PARR was purposely running down the track in order to
     the lower the value of the railroad so that the PARR could
     buy it more cheaply at the end of the five-year contract.

-----------------------------------------
1860s/early    Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The West Chester-Media Railroad Company's direct line did
     better in the early 1860's under the President, Marshall B.
     Hickman.  A short time prior to the expiration of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad's (PARR) lease on the West Chester
     Railroad, the West Chester Railroad directors made an offer
     to the PARR for a buyout.  The PARR considered the offer too
     high, so Hickman then made the new West Chester-Media
     Railroad a better offer, which they accepted without
     consulting the PARR.  The PARR complained, but letters
     uncovered, written by the chief officers, show they were
     intending to stand pat on their offer.

-----------------------------------------
1868/08/23     Source: "Obituary for L.S. McKinstry" in "Daily
               Local News" (West Chester, March 13, 1940).

     L.S. McKinstry was born on August 23, 1868.  Her parents
     were John and Anna Exton (Steele) Stone.  Her maternal
     grandfather was Hugh E.  Steele, who owned Laurel Iron Works
     and served as president of the Wilmington and Northern
     Railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1869 Source: Galloway, John Debo, THE FIRST TRANSCONTINENTAL
     RAILROAD (Simons-Boardman, 1950), 24.

     New railroads provided opportunities for manufacturing and
     trade, no longer restricted by rivers and canals.

-----------------------------------------
1872/00/00     Source: Webster, Daniel.  THE WORKS OF DANIEL
               WEBSTER, 16th ed.  Vol. II. Boston, MA.  N.p.,
               1872.

     "In the history of human inventions there is hardly one so
     well calculated as that of railroads to equalize the
     condition of men."

-----------------------------------------
1880/02/12     Source: Daily Local News (February 12, 1880)

     John Grant of West Chester got the contract for excavation
     and paving around the new PRR station located on N. Matlack
     Street between Gay and Chestnut Streets.

-----------------------------------------
1880/04/10     Source: Daily Local News (April 10, 1880)

     The West Chester firm of Lewis and Baldwin got the contract
     for brickwork on the new PRR station on North Matlack
     Street.

-----------------------------------------
1880/04/24     Source: Daily Local News (April 24, 1880)

     Joshua King, an engineer on the old West Chester &
     Philadelphia Railroad, operated the first PRR train into the
     new West Chester station on North Matlack Street.

-----------------------------------------
1880/05/15     Source: Daily Local News (May 15, 1880)

     The PRR pay car came once a month to West Chester.  Salaries
     for railway employees increased by 10% starting in 1880/04.

-----------------------------------------
1880/07/12     Source: Daily Local News (July 10, 1880)

     The new West Chester station on North Matlack Street opened
     for business on 12 July 1880.

-----------------------------------------
1883 Source: Breou's Original Series of Farm Maps, Chester County
     (Philadelphia: W. H. Kirk & Co., 1883), 18-19.

     The PRR engine house was located just east of Adams Street
     opposite Lacy Street.

-----------------------------------------
1883/08/30     Source: Daily Local News (August 30, 1883)

     John Ryan, the freight hauler in West Chester, celebrated
     his 35th birthday.  He was born in Ireland (in 1848) and
     came to the USA at age 17 (1865).  He worked for the
     Germantown and Norristown RR from 1865-1869, and for the
     West Chester and Philadelphia RR from 1869-1879.  In 1879,
     he became the town's full-time freight hauler.

-----------------------------------------
1888 Source:  "WEST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA. THE MOST IMPORTANT
     SUBURB OF PHILADELPHIA." Published under the auspices of the
     Board of Trade, 1888. P80 

     An advertisement for Abram G. Williams, a furniture dealer
     and undertaker, 39 West Gay Street, West Chester, Penna.
     Note: " Funerals arriving here by railroad can be furnished
     with carriages and hearse at the lowest prices."

-----------------------------------------
1888/06/21     Source: Daily Local News (June 21, 1888)

     The PRR tracks were raised in one day between the Barnard
     Street bridge and the North Matlack Street station by a work
     crew of nearly fifty men. 

-----------------------------------------
1888/11/20     Source: Daily Local News (November 20, 1888)

     Officer Win. Gheen provided security at the PRR station on
     North Matlack Street.

-----------------------------------------
1888/03/07     Source: W. P. H., "The New Station" in "Daily
               Local News" (March 7, 1888)

     There was a call in West Chester for the construction of an
     additional railway station on the south side of town, thanks
     to the demand from students and professors at the State
     Normal School.  The choice for names included either
     "Nields" or "Normal."  

-----------------------------------------
1889/03/05     Source: "Timetables" in "Daily Local News" (March
               5, 1889)

     The RR timetable for West Chester showed that there were 24
     trains to Philadelphia daily, and 10 trains on Sunday.

-----------------------------------------
1889/12/30     Source: Daily Local News (December 30, 1889)

     Mrs. Lamborn and Joseph Sweney were responsible for cleaning
     the PRR station at North Matlack Street.

-----------------------------------------
1889/02/13     Source: Daily Local News (February 13, 1889)

     Mrs. Lamborn, the woman who took care of the PRR station at
     North Matlack Street, reported to Officer Gheen that she had
     trouble with rowdy "colored" loiterers.

-----------------------------------------
1889/01/24     Source: Daily Local News (January 24, 1889)

     James McFadden was the section boss who directed PRR track
     operations in West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1889/01/16     Source: Daily Local News (January 16, 1889)

     Mr. McMichael was the PRR station master at North Matlack
     Street.

-----------------------------------------
1890/01/21     Source: Editorial in "Daily Local News" (January
               21, 1890)

     Evidently, there were people, mostly railroad pass holders,
     who ran for the train at the last minute.  The author of
     this editorial thought this exposed them to senseless
     danger.  The rail pass holders knew they didn't need to
     arrive early enough to buy a ticket, so they got in the
     habit of leaving at the last minute to catch the morning
     train to Philadelphia.

-----------------------------------------
1890/04/22     Source: Daily Local News (April 22, 1890)

     J. Kennard Jones returned as the baggage master at the PRR
     station on Market Street, replacing Charles Samples, after
     several weeks temporary assignment as the assistant operator
     in Oxford.

-----------------------------------------
1890/09/25     Source: Daily Local News (September 25, 1890)

     Lamborn, Sweney and D. E. Townsend worked at the PRR
     station.

-----------------------------------------
1890/12/10     Source: Daily Local News (December 10, 1890)

     Loitering at the PRR station was greatly reduced in recent
     weeks.

-----------------------------------------
1890/09/04     Source: Daily Local News (September 4, 1890)

     The Pennsylvania Railroad was in the process of building a
     new railway station at the south end of town on Adams
     Street, across the tracks from the Pennsylvania Railroad
     yard.  

-----------------------------------------
1890/07/10     Source: Daily Local News (July 10, 1890)

     According to a count by a reporter of the Daily Local News, 
     over 460 people got water from the water cooler in the PRR
     station waiting room on one day.

-----------------------------------------
1890/06/23     Source: Daily Local News (June 23, 1890)

     The PRR station got its first water cooler.

-----------------------------------------
1890/07/05     Source: Daily Local News (August 5, 1890)

     Frank Patton, the telegraph operator at the PRR station on
     Market Street, was promoted to the Media station and
     replaced by William S. Valentine of Avondale.

-----------------------------------------
1892/07/14     Source: Daily Local News (July 14, 1892)

     Clement Proctor of West Chester got the contract to
     whitewash the PRR station.

-----------------------------------------
1892/04/06     Source: Daily Local News (April 6, 1892)

     East Nields Street crossed the Pennsylvania Railroad "Media
     Line" at "an ugly grade crossing" near the engine house. 
     The extension of East Nields Street offered a convenience to
     farmers from southeast of town.

-----------------------------------------
1892/01/20     Source: Daily Local News (January 20, 1892)

     After the borough of West Chester decided to extend East
     Nields Street past the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks to the
     borough line at Bolmar Street, a jury awarded damages of
     $300 to A. D. Sharples and $105 to Pennsylvania Railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1892/03/23     Source: Daily Local News (March 23, 1892)

     Mr. Gillingham was the ticket agent at the PRR station.

-----------------------------------------
1892/03/30     Source: Daily Local News (March 30, 1892)

     John J. Pinkerton was the attorney for the PRR.

-----------------------------------------
1892/09/02     Source: "What I Saw at the Station at West
               Chester" reprinted from the "Pottstown Ledger" of
               Wednesday, in "Daily Local News" (September 2,
               1892)

     This article describes the procession of people who used the
     water cooler at the PRR station.  

-----------------------------------------
1892/12/30     Source: Daily Local News (December 30, 1892)

     A year-long rail pass between Philadelphia and West Chester
     cost $123, up from $80 some time earlier.  The trip was
     slow, normally taking from one hour to one-and-a-quarter
     hours one-way, and sometimes as long as two hours.  There
     were many complaints from passengers.

-----------------------------------------
1892/12/30     Source: Daily Local News (December 30, 1892)

     A meeting of PRR patrons led to a petition calling for
     better railway service.  Among the participants at the
     meeting were Wm. B. Waddell, Thomas P. Worrall, Wm. S. Kirk,
     Charles Paxson, Edward S. Paxson, Jos. Kift Jr., Wm. T.
     Barber, Edw. Barber, Professor J. T. Rothrock, James C.
     Sellers, Col. A. A. Houke, L. B. Eyster, Thos. T. Smith,
     Jerome B. Gray, Hugh DeHaven, John B. Lucas, Thos. B.
     Taylor, Samuel D. Ramsey, Joseph Hemphill, J. Sergeant, W.
     W. MacElree, Wm. S. Kirk, Robert Emmett Monaghan, E. Dallett
     Hemphill, Joseph Thompson, John S. Lucas, Henry H. Pyle, and
     William Scattergood.

-----------------------------------------
1892/11/10     Source: Daily Local News (November 10, 1892)

     Mr. Finnegan, the gatekeeper for the PRR crossing at Market
     Street, worked more than 12 hours each day.  He began before
     the first train left at 06h00, and stayed until after the
     18h00 train arrived from Philadelphia.  That meant the
     crossing was unguarded for the last four hours of the day.

-----------------------------------------
1892/11/26     Source: Daily Local News (November 26, 1892)

     Frank Burnett was head of the PRR station fire company.

-----------------------------------------
1892/11/25     Source: Daily Local News (November 25, 1892)

     Mr. Finnegan's hours as gatekeeper at the Market Street RR
     crossing were extended to after the departure of the 22h27
     train to Philadelphia.  That meant he worked more than 16
     hours each day.

-----------------------------------------
1892/11/25     Source: Daily Local News (November 25, 1892)

     A train struck a horse-drawn meat wagon belonging to S. A.
     Conradt at the Union Street grade level crossing.  Although
     neither Mr. Conradt nor his horse were injured, the wagon
     was destroyed.  Charles Riley Jr. was an eyewitness.

-----------------------------------------
1893/12/08     Source: Daily Local News (December 8, 1893)

     The news agent of the PRR station on Market Street was
     Townsend.

-----------------------------------------
1893/11/11     Source: Daily Local News (November 11, 1893)

     People scavenged coal lumps at night using lanterns, from
     around the locomotive turntable located at Chestnut and
     North Matlack Streets.  They were tempted by the regular
     coal pile nearby, but railway guards kept them away.

-----------------------------------------
1893/12/20     Source: Daily Local News (December 20, 1893)

     Two workers were fired at the PRR freight station, Eugene
     Talley and "one of the car cleaners."  That left only Frank
     Burnett to handle all freight loading and unloading.

-----------------------------------------
1893/12/15     Source: Daily Local News (December 15, 1893)

     The resident cleaning woman of the PRR station on Market
     Street was Mrs. Kate Lamborn.

-----------------------------------------
1893/08/25     Source: Daily Local News (August 25, 1893)

     The superintendent of the PRR station on Market Street was
     W. A. McMichael.

-----------------------------------------
1893/09/21     Source: Daily Local News (September 21, 1893)

     The conductor on the PRR Media Branch was Miller.

-----------------------------------------
1893/07/06     Source: Daily Local News (July 6, 1893)

     West Chester Streets Commissioner Eachus led an inspection
     of the East Nields Street extension.  At the time, a gang of
     mostly Irish laborers were clearing brush and briars from
     the "jungle" on the Pennsylvania Railroad property.  They
     obtained fill dirt to raise East Nields Street to the level
     of the railroad from an excavation for an alley on property
     owned by P. J. Jefferis, which ran from Matlack to Walnut
     Streets between Nields and Lacy Streets.

-----------------------------------------
1893/05/18     Source: Daily Local News (May 18, 1893)

     Terence Finnegan, the gatekeeper at the PRR crossing on
     Market Street, now had help from Daniel Clancy, who worked
     the twelve hour night shift.  The article noted that
     Finnegan "uses no tobacco or whiskey in any form."

-----------------------------------------
1893/09/12     Source: Daily Local News (September 12, 1893)

     The borough of West Chester built a "substantial bridge" on
     East Nields Street over the small creek just east of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad tracks.

-----------------------------------------
1894/05/03     Source: Daily Local News (May 3, 1894)

     James Wallace, an ex-policeman and ex-employee of the
     Customs House in Philadelphia, replaced Miller Snare as the
     general assistant and messenger at the PRR station.  The
     station master was still W. A. McMichael, and other
     employees included H. A. Gillingham, Walter Keech, conductor
     Edward Miller and baggage master George Guss.

-----------------------------------------
1894/03/03     Source: Daily Local News (March 3, 1894)

     There was a penny scale at the train station, but it was out
     of order.  The author asked if this was due to something he
     observed some time ago, when a group of small boys put a
     single penny in the scale, and then each jumped on in place
     of the previous boy before the scale could reset.  In this
     way, they all got weighed for a single penny.

-----------------------------------------
1894/03/28     Source: Daily Local News (March 28, 1894)

     Miller Snare was retired from the PRR by this time.  He was
     in bad health (and according to the death register, died in
     the following month).  William Munshower represented the
     Union News Company at the station.

-----------------------------------------
1894/05/19     Source: Daily Local News (May 19, 1894)

     William Gheen was a ticket agent at the PRR station.

-----------------------------------------
1894/11/08     Source: Daily Local News (November 8, 1894)

     Mr. Rigg of Clifton briefly served as baggage master at the
     PRR station after George Guss, but gave up after a few weeks
     due to illness.

-----------------------------------------
1894/06/21     Source: Daily Local News (June 21, 1894)

     One train operated with conductor Marsh, baggage master
     Frank S. Wetsel and flagman Robert Cunningham.

-----------------------------------------
1894/11/16     Source: Daily Local News (November 16, 1894)

     Josiah Burnett was head of the freight warehouse at the PRR
     station.  He was assisted by Frank Burnett and Isaac Smiley.

-----------------------------------------
1894/12/18     Source: Daily Local News (December 18, 1894)

     The old Pennsylvania Railroad station at Matlack and Gay
     Street was no longer in service and stood empty.

-----------------------------------------
1894/11/06     Source: Daily Local News (November 6, 1894)

     George Guss, the stationmaster at the PRR station, left to
     work for an electrical firm in Philadelphia, after two years
     in West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1894/11/12     Source: Daily Local News (November 12, 1894)

     E. Harvey Hummell was the new baggage master at the PRR
     station on Market Street.

-----------------------------------------
1894/07/11     Source: Daily Local News (July 11, 1894)

     Another train operated under the control of conductor Shaw
     and baggage man Isaac Jones.  Shaw was replaced by John
     Kerwin.  Also, George Mendenhall was on sick leave because
     his foot was run over by a milk car.

-----------------------------------------
1894/10/15     Source: Daily Local News (October 15, 1894)

     David E. Townsend was the ticket collector at the PRR
     station.

-----------------------------------------
1894/07/17     Source: Daily Local News (July 17, 1894)

     Howard A. Gillingham was the ticket agent at the PRR
     station.  Clark Pyle was the "night operator."  This article
     also mentioned George Guss, Mrs. Lamborn, and the baggage
     master Jesse Wilson.

-----------------------------------------
1894/08/20     Source: Daily Local News (August 20, 1894)

     The workers at the PRR station made preparations for "the
     handling of trunks next Monday when the Normalites return." 
     (Normalites were the students and faculty at the West
     Chester Normal School.)

-----------------------------------------
1894/09/04     Source: Daily Local News (September 4, 1894)

     The conductor on the PRR Frazer Branch was Joseph Keech, and
     the baggage master of the PRR station on Market Street was
     Jesse Wilson.

-----------------------------------------
1895 Source: Laws of Pennsylvania, Busch, State Printer, no. sec.
     36,1895.

     No railroad or steamboat or any other type of transportation
     shall accept or move a body unless there has been a burial
     permit issued by the Board of Health. 

-----------------------------------------
1895/05/25     Source: Daily Local News (May 25, 1895)

     H. Jesse Wilson was promoted to conductor on the PRR.

-----------------------------------------
1895/04/02     Source: Daily Local News (April 2, 1895)

     Sharp Griffith got a new job at the PRR freight station.

-----------------------------------------
1895/06/24     Source: Daily Local News (June 24, 1895)

     William Gheen was the assistant to ticket agent Gillingham. 
     McMichael was still the PRR station master, and two other
     employees were named Wallace and Sweney.

-----------------------------------------
1895/03/18     Source: Daily Local News (March 18, 1895)

     This was a complaint about "colored" boys who loafed at the
     train station, used bad language and littered the floor with
     peanut shells.

-----------------------------------------
1895/03/27     Source: Daily Local News (March 27, 1895)

     PRR Conductor Milton Shaw.  Conductor Marsh and Engineer
     John Richards.

-----------------------------------------
1895/03/20     Source: "Last Night Was Rather Cool for Sleeping
               Out of Doors" in "Daily Local News" (March 20,
               1895)

     This article contained an anonymous conversation with a
     blue-collar laborer from Chester.  He took the train to West
     Chester and slept outdoors upon arrival.  He had heard that
     he might get work at a nursery.

-----------------------------------------
1898/03/07     Source: Daily Local News (March 7, 1898)

     Josiah Burnett was an invalid after 25 years working for the
     PRR.

-----------------------------------------
1899/04/05     Source: Daily Local News (1899/04/45).

     Names of men who worked for the PRR: Josiah Burnett (JJ:
     probably junior, since Josiah Burnett was an invalid in
     1898/03/07) was the "head man," assisted by Millard Snare,
     Michael Reagan and John Ryan.

-----------------------------------------
1899/01/02     Source: DLN (January 2, 1899)

     The electric trolley from WC to 63rd Street in Philadelphia
     started operation, but was delayed by a snowstorm on its
     inaugural run.  The trolley cost 25 one-way, and departed
     roughly once an hour.  William M. Hayes was the president of
     the West Chester Electric Railway.  In a section that
     mentions connections to other lines, this article indicates
     that the WC-Lenape trolley line was already in operation,
     under separate ownership.

-----------------------------------------
1900/01/02     Source: DLN (January 2, 1900)

     According to an advertisement by John Wanamaker of
     Philadelphia, the electric trolley from WC to Philadelphia
     took 1h48 each way and cost 30 cents each way.

-----------------------------------------
1900/08/23     Source: Daily Local News (August 23, 1900)

     Elwood Datchell, the baggage agent at the PRR station on
     Market Street, was transferred to West Grove.  He was
     replaced by Mr. Eckley, who came from West Grove.

-----------------------------------------
1900/02/28     Source: Daily Local News (February 28, 1900)

     John F. Ryan married Mary Hally of "near Frazer."  The maid
     of honor was a Miss Geehan and the groomsman was James
     Farrell.

-----------------------------------------
1902/07/21     Source: Daily Local News (July 21, 1902)

     John F. Ryan died in Philadelphia of complications following
     an accident which crushed his foot a few years ago and left
     an unhealed wound.  He was survived by his wife and five
     children.  He was "brother-in-law of Michael, James, and
     Kate Flanagan and Mrs. Michael Brennan."

-----------------------------------------
1902/05/31     Source: Daily Local News (May 31, 1902)

     Christian Kautz was the gatekeeper for the PRR at the Market
     Street crossing.

-----------------------------------------
1902/11/20     Source: Daily Local News (November 20, 1902)

     Small boys congregated at the PRR station and West Chester
     trolley stations to earn money carrying baggage for
     returning teachers.  At least one woman reported that her
     baggage was lost as a result.

-----------------------------------------
1903/03/27     Source: Daily Local News (March 27, 1903)

     Fire destroyed the old railway station at Gay Street.  It
     was built in the 1850s, but empty and unused by 1903.  The
     frame construction building was owned by Uriah Painter.

-----------------------------------------
1906/04/18     Source: Daily Local News (April 18, 1906)

     West Chester Streets Commissioner John C. Heed announced
     that improvements would be made to E. Union Street at the
     PRR crossing.  The PRR decided to leave an at-grade
     crossing, so West Chester borough opted to raise the street
     level and pave it.  This was an improvement for the horse
     teams that carried freight away from the PRR freight station
     on E. Union Street.
     The same article mentioned that the East Barnard Street
     "underhead" bridge was not yet finished.

-----------------------------------------
1916/07/22     Source: Obituary for Cornelia W. T. Monaghan in
               "Daliy Local News"

     Cornelia W. T. Monaghan was a widow, age 63 who died at
     Chester County Hospital.  She was the daughter of Joseph P.
     and Jane T. Ellicott Wilson.  Her father was a leading
     member of CC Bar Association, Burgess of West Chester 1855 -
     1857, President, Philadelphia Baltimore Central RR.  11-13-
     79 married R. Jones Monaghan who "died in 1897."  2 children 
     died as infants 2 survive--Frances E., a patient at CC
     Hospital with "badly sprained ankle" and Walter E., employed
     in Philadelphia.  members of First Presbyterian Church WC.

-----------------------------------------
1917/06/14     Source: Leah Schechter, editor, I JUST WANTED TO
               MAKE A CONTRIBUTION: THE LIFE OF WALTER T. KERWIN
               (West Chester: Henderson High School AP History,
               1992), 2.  CCHS#E745.K39

     Walter (Jr) was born on June 14, 1917 and grew up at 124 E.
     Linden Street.  Walter's father was Walter T. Kerwin (Sr). 
     He was known as "Big Dutch" and Walter was known simply as
     "Dutch."

-----------------------------------------
1922/03/30     Source: Daily Local News (March 30, 1922)

     Dennis McDevitt was preparing to move from 559 South
     Franklin Street to a house on Marshall Street owned by
     William Chalfant Jr.  McDevitt worked as the gatekeeper at
     the Pennsylvania Railroad crossing on Market Street.

-----------------------------------------
1923/04/18     Source: Daily Local News (April 23, 1923)

     R. Jones Patrick & Son, real estate agents, sold the
     property at 523 South Franklin Street belonging to Lydia B.
     Beaver, to Dennis McDevitt of West Chester.  The house was a
     modern, six-room dwelling.

-----------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 31.

     It is served by two branches of the Pennsylvania Railroad
     and several bus and trolley lines.  Its beautiful homes and
     shaded streets make West Chester a delightful town."

-----------------------------------------
1930s     Source: Leah Schechter, editor, I JUST WANTED TO MAKE A
          CONTRIBUTION: THE LIFE OF WALTER T. KERWIN (West
          Chester: Henderson High School AP History, 1992), 2. 
          CCHS#E745.K39

     Walter T. Kerwin (Sr) worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad,
     and after the depression, became the tax collector for West
     Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1947/00/00     Source: Holbrook Stewart, H.  THE STORY OF
               AMERICAN RAILROADS.  New York: Crown Publishers,
               1947, 33.

     The biggest drawback to hauling goods by wagon from the East
     coast was the natural barrier of the Allegheny Mountains.

-----------------------------------------
1949/00/00     Source: Burgess, George H.  CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF
               THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD (Philadelphia, PA: The
               Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 1949), 400-401.

     The West Chester and Philadelphia was incorporated in 1848
     to build a suburban line between the two points named, a
     distance of 26 miles, all south of the Main Line of Public
     Works. Or, in other words, the Philadelphia and Columbia
     Railroad. The company was organized until 1850, and
     construction was  started in 1852, and completed in as far
     as Media in 1854, and in West Chester in 1858,

-----------------------------------------
1952/07/11     Source: Daily Local News (July 11, 1952)

     The first diesel locomotive reached West Chester.

-----------------------------------------

Return to the Riggtown Home Page.