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Miscellaneous Notes on the History of
Modernization in Chester County

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This file contains assorted facts from Chester County history collected by students in the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

This file has not been completely proofread, nor have the sources been verified, so use this material with caution.

Collected by Jim Jones, David Flogaus, Kelly Kulp-Bosler, Mike Wolford and Bob Gialanella (Spring 1995). Additional data collected by Jim Jones, Vincent Civiletti, Christopher Waychunas, Nancy Hershey, Robert Troutman, Robert Gregory, John Morrison, Scott Harre, and Daniel Cleary (Spring 1996, for HIS480). Last edited By Kenneth McFadden (April 29, 1996).


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1737 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 89.

     In 1737, John Chadd was authorized by the county
     commissioners to operate a ferry across the Brandywine Creek
     on the Baltimore to Philadelphia road.

-----------------------------------------
1794 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The Gazette"
     (1794)

-----------------------------------------
1796 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
     COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES,
     Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p214

     "In 1796, Isaac Webb removed from some other house to the
     "General ... [card damaged in original file]

-----------------------------------------
1797      Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
          Temple, 1926), 108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The Literary
     Museum" (1797)

-----------------------------------------
1797 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, INDEX TO FAMILIES
     AND PERSONS, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA: WITH
     GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (Danbury, PA: Richard
     T. and Mildred Williams, 1971), 226.

     With his brother-in-law, Nathan Sharples Philip Derrick,
     established " the tavern known by the Name of the Turk's
     Head, in Goshen.. . "  He added a new brick house.  He also
     founded "The Literary Museum, " a monthly magazine, but it
     was in advance of the age and survived only a short time.

-----------------------------------------
1798/04/01     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The first post office in the county was established at
     Downingtown on 1 April 1798, under postmaster Hunt Downing.

-----------------------------------------
1799 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 21.

     The first fire companies in West Chester were the West
     Chester Fire Company, founded 1799

-----------------------------------------
1800 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 91.

     For an early list of old inns, see Bayard Taylor, STORY OF
     KENNETT (Kennett, PA, 1866).   The two best known inns in
     West Chester were "Turk's Head" and "Greentree."  There were
     others, unnamed in this book.

-----------------------------------------
1802 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 884.

     A small market was built behind the public buildings in West
     Chester in 1802, but it was not very successful because
     merchants preferred to visit their customers at home.  (JJ:
     probably using wagons)  The town built a bigger market on
     Market Street in 1831 and enlarged it several times in the
     subsequent 20-25 years.

-----------------------------------------
1803 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 90.

     A road from Wilmington to Reading via West Chester was built
     at an early date.  It was extended in 1803 with a turnpike
     from Downington to Harrisburg via Honeybrook and Ephrata,
     and became known as the "Horsehoe Pike."

-----------------------------------------
1804/01/01     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The West Chester post office was established on 1 January
     1804.  

-----------------------------------------
1809 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "Chester and
     Delaware Federalist" (1809)

-----------------------------------------
1809 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 885.

     Dr. William Darlington laid West Chester's first foot
     pavement using flagstones in 1809.  Several other private
     individuals followed his example, and started to use bricks
     instead of stones.  

-----------------------------------------
1812      Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of
          Chester County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace
          F.  Temple, 1926), 215-216.

     1812 - The Coatesville post office was created in 1812 and
     Moses Coates became the first postmaster.

-----------------------------------------
1814 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 28.

     The Bank of West Chester was founded in 1814 on High Street
     almost directly across from the court house.

-----------------------------------------
1815-1825 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
          Temple, 1926), 92.

     There was little canal construction in Chester County,
     except along the Schuykill River between 1815-1825. 
     However, John Fitch of Bucks County operated regular
     steamboat service between Wilmington, Chester, Philadelphia
     and Trenton as early as 1787.

-----------------------------------------
1818 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "Village
     Record" (1818)

-----------------------------------------
1823 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 885.

     In 1823, the town began to systematically lay brick
     sidewalks.

-----------------------------------------
1827      Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF
          CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
          BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Philadelphia: Louis H.
          Everts, 1881)  p359

     In 1827, the Legislature authorized canal commissioners to
     make examinations through Chester and Lancaster Counties for
     a railroad to connect with the Pennsylvania Canal.  In 1828,
     these commissioners were directed to locate and put under
     contract a railroad through Chester County via Lancaster to
     Columbia. 

-----------------------------------------
1827-1847      Source: Phoenixville Chamber of Commerce 1940
               Trade Show
Company Background Information Sheet ""History of the Iron and
Steel Industry in Phoenixville, Pa." "
Historical Society of the Phoenixville Area

In 1827 the Reeves family purchased controlling interest in the
Phoenix Works, a small rolling mill and nail factory in
Phoenixville.  By 1947 the Phoenix Works employed 147 people,
with an annual output of 1500 tons of pig iron and 32,000 kegs of
nails.

-----------------------------------------
1829-1830 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The
          Union History Company, 1898), 885.

     In 1829 and 1830, Gay and Church Streets in West Chester
     were paved for the first time.

-----------------------------------------
1831 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 884.

     West Chester built a bigger market on Market Street in 1831
     and enlarged it several times in the subsequent 20-25 years.

-----------------------------------------
1831 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     The Philadelphia and Reading Railroad was organized in 1831.

-----------------------------------------
1831-1832 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
          WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY
          OF THE BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT
          TIME.. . (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers,
          E.F. James, printer, 1857, 37.

     "Among the causes which, about this time, began to impart
     additional animation and vital energy to the Borough, was
     the construction of the West Chester Railroad (9 miles in
     length), in the years 1831-32."  The track was constructed
     of yellow pine pieces, plated with flat iron bars.  The
     motive power was horsepower.  

-----------------------------------------
1832 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1832, a railway spur was constructed from West Chester to
     Malvern, using yellow pine rails placed on stone sleepers.

-----------------------------------------
1832 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     John P. Baily, Esq. was in charge of the West Chester
     Railroad.  It was the first work of its kind completed in
     Pennsylvania.  It was finished on time and within the
     estimated cost.

-----------------------------------------
1833 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 21.

     The second fire company in West Chester, the Good Will Fire
     company, was founded in 1833.

-----------------------------------------
1833 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The first railroad was completed from Columbia to
     Philadelphia in 1833 using horses for motive power.  

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     106.

     The Act of 1834 authorized the construction of public
     schools so that the sons of poor men would obtain
     preparation for college.

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1834, the first English-made locomotive was placed in
     service on the railway spur that connected West Chester to
     Malvern.

-----------------------------------------
1834      Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF
          CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
          BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Philadelphia: Louis H.
          Everts, 1881)  p360

     The Columbia Railroad began operating in February 1834 from
     Columbia, Pennsylvania on the Susquehanna River to
     Philadelphia.

-----------------------------------------
1834 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     1834 the West Chester Railroad built a connecting road from
     Kirkland Station across to Whiteland to reach the limestone
     and marble quarries (JJ: possibly Boot Road between PA100
     and US202).  The next year, marble from the Thomas quarry
     was available for the front of the Chester County Bank. 
     This road proved a financial loss, however.

-----------------------------------------
1834/01/01     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The West Chester Railroad declared its first dividend on the
     first of January, 1834.  The dividend was 3%.  Future
     prospects looked good at this point.  

-----------------------------------------
1834/07   Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
          CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
          January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester University
          special collections.

     In July of 1834, William Sharpless was appointed the
     Superintendent for the West Chester Railroad.  He lived in
     Philadelphia, because the company built a hotel on Broad
     Street south of Race Street.  Called the West Chester House,
     it housed the company cars and was the depot for freighting
     done to West Chester.  Sharpless had large warehouses built.

-----------------------------------------
1837 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 32.

     Illustration: engraved picture showing the intersection of
     High and Market Streets in 1837. (Courtesy of the National
     Bank of Chester County)  JJ: It appears to show the
     courthouse on the left, with a clock tower and weather vane
     similar to the present one.  That makes me think that this
     picture must be of the view towards the north.  However, it
     must be the old courthouse, since this picture is dated
     earlier than 1846 (see notes from p76).  Note the use of
     stone slabs to provide a pedestrian crossing at the
     intersection of the dirt streets.

-----------------------------------------
1837 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The Chester County Bank lost half of its capital in the
     general crash of 1837.  As a consequence, the West Chester
     Railroad suffered major losses and fell heavily in debt.

-----------------------------------------
1838 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 21.

     The third fire company in West Chester, the Fame Fire
     Company, was founded in 1838.

-----------------------------------------
1838 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 884.

     The West Chester street plan expanded in 1838 to include
     land north of the Matlack property on the north side; beyond
     the "old Turk's Head or Patton estate" on the east side, and
     beyond John Rutter's land on the northwest.

-----------------------------------------
1839      Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF
          CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
          BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Philadelphia: Louis H.
          Everts, 1881)  p214

     The "White Hall" tavern, owned by Philip P. Sharples from
     1838-1839, was popular among judges, lawyers, and
     politicians who wanted to relax from their cases.

-----------------------------------------
1839 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     No dividends were paid to West Chester Railroad stockholders
     during 1839.  The stockholders were not happy.  The West
     Chester Railroad did receive some breaks from the state on
     toll rates for use on the Columbia Road.  The directors were
     apparently maligned by the Directors.  Since its inception,
     the West Chester Railroad paid the state $30, 000 in tolls.

-----------------------------------------
1840 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 6, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1840, the West Chester Railroad considered creating a
     more direct line, but thought it was too expensive.

-----------------------------------------
1841 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 881-882.

     West Chester received its first waterworks system in 1841,
     on land purchased from Anthony Bolmar for $2344.28 and land
     from Joshua Hoopes for $200.  The reservoir and pumping
     station were located at Marshall Square.

-----------------------------------------
1842 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1842, expenses were reduced from the previous year $2400,
     but income on the WCRR dropped $2900.  The condition of the
     track was so bad that it needed to be relaid.  The directors
     authorized the purchase of 600 hundred ton of T-rails, but
     they only bought 40 tons before they ran out of money.

-----------------------------------------
1842-1910 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
          Temple, 1926), 108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The
     Jeffersonian" (1842-1910) 

-----------------------------------------
1844/05/25     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     An agreement was reached with Canal Commission for a rate of
     $15 a train for running from the West Chester intersection
     of the Columbia-Philadelphia Railroad to the inclined plane. 
     It started operating on 5/25/1844.  Two second-hand 8-
     wheeled passenger cars were bought for service.  Then two
     new cars were commissioned from the W.E. Allison Company. 
     The baggage on these cars was carried beneath the seat.

-----------------------------------------
1844/mid  Source: the "Daily Local News" (West Chester, January
          20, 1898), 7, in West Chester University special
          collections.

     Second half of 1844, the Executive Committee of the West
     Chester Railroad recommended reconstruction of the road with
     the same kind of rails as before. It would cost $15, 000.

-----------------------------------------
1845 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     Steam power was introduced on the West Chester Railroad in
     1845, which crushed the wooden track by 1849.  Iron edge
     rails were substituted starting in this year.  This made it
     a substantial track.   The West Chester Railroad connected
     West Chester with Philadelphia.  

-----------------------------------------
1846/04/28     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On April 28, 1846, Philip D. Thomas appointed Superintendent
     of the West Chester Railroad.  There was already evidence
     that the new locomotives were destroying the light iron
     track.

-----------------------------------------
1847 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The Directors of the West Chester Railroad proposed to
     construct heavier track.  Stockholders agreed to a further
     mortgage of $15, 000 to secure the funds for this purpose. 
     Philip Sharples was again elected a Director.  Directors and
     officers of the road with friends raised $ to purchase new
     rails.  In 1847 the stronger track was rebuilt.  The debt
     was paid from profits in 2 years.  (Not true MW)

-----------------------------------------
1849 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     Steam power was introduced on the West Chester Railroad in
     1845, but the locomotives crushed the wooden track by 1849,
     so iron edge rails were substituted.

-----------------------------------------
1850/10/14     Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY
               OF CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
               BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Philadelphia: Louis H.
               Everts, 1881) p360
     
     John J. Parker, in some reminiscences published in the Daily
     Local News of May 24, 1879, states that in 1850, after the
     completion of the branch to West Philadelphia which avoided
     the inclined plane, the West Chester passengers were
     conveyed by this route to Philadelphia.  The first train of
     cars with passengers crossed the Philadelphia Market Street
     bridge on Oct. 14, 1850, with Philip P. Sharpless (note
     spelling M.W.), of West Chester, then superintendent of the
     'old road' in charge.

     Three passenger trains ran on the Columbia Railroad - 1)
     fast line - west every morning, 2) slow line - west every
     afternoon, and 3) nightime - west in the evening.

-----------------------------------------
1850s     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
          Temple, 1926), 85.

     One of several "underground railroad" routes passed from
     Kennett, East Bradford, West Chester, Willistown and on to
     Philadelphia.

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     103.

     Ercildoun Seminary was founded in 1851 by Smedley Darlington
     as a boy's school, but it soon changed to an all-girls
     school.  

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 45.

     West Chester received its first telegraph connection in
     1851.

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The proponents of the West Chester-Media-Philadelphia
     Railroad wanted to avoid the Canal Commission charges for
     the use of the inclined plane west of Philadelphia.  They
     decided the cost would be one million dollars.
     A new generation of professional men, some enemies of the
     old West Chester Railroad, and businessmen from Delaware
     County organized to build a "West Chester and Philadelphia
     Railroad.  

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     The two West Chester railroads clashed.  The owners of the
     old road, finding their property value increasing, refused
     to join with the new road.  They warned potential investors
     in the other railroad, that they could lose all of their
     money.  A violent newspaper war ensued between the friends
     of the two lines.  

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 38.

     The proposal to build a second railroad was animated by the
     belief that Philadelphia might be made a first rate place if
     not so far from West Chester.  

     "In the age of Progress and annexation, we all go
     incontinently for the annihilation of time and monopoly of
     space."  - the author

-----------------------------------------
1851 Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
     CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West Chester,
     January 20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
     collections.

     In 1851, the state finished grading tracks that took the
     Columbia line directly into Philadelphia.  The line ran on
     bridge to Market Street and then to Broad Street.  A depot
     for passengers and freight on the southwest corner of Broad
     and Market Streets.

-----------------------------------------
1852 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 45.

     West Chester received its first gas company (for lighting)
     was founded in 1852.

-----------------------------------------
1852 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 886.

     West Chester received its first gas light company in 1852.

-----------------------------------------
1853 Source: Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A
     HISTORY (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes
     Bros. & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
     Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors,
     THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh and Eighth
     Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family Organization,
     Inc., 1979), 252.

     Josiah Hoopes started his nursery in 1853 with specimens
     shipped from "the great house of James Backus & Son of York,
     England.".

-----------------------------------------
1853 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 977.

     "Josiah Hoopes, in October, 1853, first conceived the idea
     of a nursery and green-house business, and began with one
     small green-house and one acre of ground."  

-----------------------------------------
1854 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     106-107.

     The position of County Superintendent of Schools was created
     in 1854 against the opposition of many school masters, and
     the first man to hold the position was Robert Agnew Futhey
     of Parkesburg.  (JJ: J. Smith Futhey wrote a book indexing
     biographies of Chester County citizens.  It is in the
     library.)  Other superintendents were: Franklin Taylor
     (1857-1860), W. W. Woodruff (1860-1869), George L. Maris
     (1869-1872), Hiram F. Pierce (1872- 1876, 11 December),
     Jacob W. Harvey (1877-1887), Joseph S. Walton (1877-1896
     September), Frank P. Bye (1896-1900), George W. Moore (1900-
     1914), Thomas A. Bock (1914-1920 December), and Clyde T.
     Saylor (1920-).

-----------------------------------------
1855-1886      Source: Phoenixville Chamber of Commerce 1940
               Trade Show.  Company Background Information Sheet
               ""History of the Iron and Steel Industry in
               Phoenixville, PA." 

     In 1855 the Phoenix Works was merged into a new company
     incorporated as the Phoenix Iron Company.  David Reeves
     became president, and his son Samuel J. Reeves became vice
     president and treasurer.  The new company began the
     manufacture of beams, bridges, roofs, girders, and other
     varieties of structural iron.  In 1886 the Phoenixville Iron
     Company also began the manufacture of steel products, all
     products theretofore having been exclusively iron.

-----------------------------------------
1857 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 885.

     By 1857, almost all of the sidewalks in West Chester were
     bricked, and its streets were much improved.

-----------------------------------------
1857 Source: Darlington, William, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF
     WEST CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME ...
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857), 102.

     Under the heading of libraries, Daniel Nields was listed as
     vice-president of the Working Men's Institute.

-----------------------------------------
1857 Source: William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 143.

     The 1857-1858 West Chester directory contains an
     advertisement for Sharples & Hall, Brickmakers.  The owner
     was listed as S. Emlen Sharples.

-----------------------------------------
1857/04/27     Source: Futhey, J.  Smith and Gilbert Cope. 
               "History of Chester county, Pennsylvania, with
               Genealogical and Biographical Sketches"
               (Philadelphia: Louis H.  Everts, 1881), 388.

     On April 27, 1857, The Bank of Chester Valley was
     incorporated.  It was located in Coatesville.  Abraham
     Gibbons was president, Francis F.  Davis was cashier, and
     the board of directors consisted of; Abraham Gibbons, Nathan
     Rambo, Enoch S.  McCaughey, William Dripps, Henry G. 
     Thomas, Caleb Pierce, Lewis Maxton, Hugh W.  Steele
     (maternal grandfather of Loraine Stone McKinstry, A3-1),
     Isaac Hayes, Charles Downing, John W.  Wagoner, Samuel
     Slokom, and James King Grier.  In 1864, bank became the
     National Bank of Chester Valley.

-----------------------------------------
1857/08/01     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The Pennsylvania Company bought the rights to the state
     railroads and canals at auction on August 1, 1857.

-----------------------------------------
1858 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
     COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES,
     Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p359

     The West Chester Railroad Company was subjected to unjust
     and oppressive regulations, according to officials of the
     first West Chester Railroad.  These helped cause the
     formation of a company for construction of an independent
     line by way of Media.  In 1858 the old line was leased by
     the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.

-----------------------------------------
1858/11/11     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1857, the Pennsylvania Railroad took over the operation
     of the railway line between West Chester and Malvern, and
     the first train reached West Chester from Philadelphia via
     Media on 11 November 1858.

-----------------------------------------
1859/04/06     Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     An five year agreement between the West Chester Railroad and
     the Pennsylvania Railroad began on April 6, 1859.  The PARR
     took possession of the line and agreed to run the trains on
     satisfactory terms.  The West Chester Railroad claimed that
     the PARR was purposely running down the track in order to
     the lower the value of the railroad so that the PARR could
     buy it more cheaply at the end of the five-year contract.

-----------------------------------------
1860's/early   Source: Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING
               IN CHESTER COUNTY in the "Daily Local News" (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The West Chester-Media Railroad Company's direct line did
     better in the early 1860's under the President, Marshall B.
     Hickman.  A short time prior to the expiration of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad's (PARR) lease on the West Chester
     Railroad, the West Chester Railroad directors made an offer
     to the PARR for a buyout.  The PARR considered the offer too
     high, so Hickman then made the new West Chester-Media
     Railroad a better offer, which they accepted without
     consulting the PARR.  The PARR complained, but letters
     uncovered, written by the chief officers, show they were
     intending to stand pat on their offer.

-----------------------------------------
1861/08/23     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 108.

     "The Jeffersonian" (1842-1910) was one of only a few
     northern papers that supported the South during the civil
     war.  A mob attacked its office and partially wrecked it (no
     date given).  On 23 August 1861, US Marshall William
     Millward ordered the newspaper closed, but after a protest
     and lawsuit, the newspaper was allowed to reopen on 26
     October 1861.  The Postmaster General Blair barred "The
     Jeffersonian" from using the mails to distribute its issues,
     but it continued in operation until 1910.

-----------------------------------------
     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     103.

     Smedley Darlington's younger brother, Richard Darlington,
     bought the Ercildoun Seminary in 1861 and operated it
     successfully until it was destroyed by a tornado in 1877.

-----------------------------------------
1863      Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, INDEX TO
          FAMILIES AND PERSONS, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY,
          PENNSYLVANIA: WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL
          SKETCHES (Danbury, PA: Richard T. and Mildred Williams,
          1971), 387.

     Philip Sharples was a member for the first board of
     directors of The Bank of West Chester.  "Before the
     expiration of the last charter it was surrendered to the
     state, and the bank, known as the Bank of Chester, was
     reorganized under the laws of the United States as "The
     National Bank of Chester County."  

-----------------------------------------
1865/09/29     Source: Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus Hoopes &
               Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors,
               THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. I, The First Six
               Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family
               Organization, Inc., 1979), 291.

     Josiah Hoopes' uncle, Jasper Hoopes, (B19-2) died on
     1865/09/29, probably in an insane asylum in Philadelphia.

-----------------------------------------
1866 Source: Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A
     HISTORY (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes
     Bros. & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
     Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors,
     THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh and Eighth
     Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family Organization,
     Inc., 1979), 252.

     In 1866, George B. Thomas joined Josiah and Abner Hoopes in
     their nursery firm as the "office partner" (accountant,
     presumably).  The name changed to Hoopes Brothers and
     Thomas.

-----------------------------------------
1867      Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of
          Chester County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace
          F.  Temple, 1926), 215-216.

     1867 - Coatesville became a borough.  First election of
     officers: William B.  Morrison, Abram Gibbons, Craig
     Ridgeway, Richard Strode, William T.  hunt, Joseph Suydam.

-----------------------------------------
1868 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 608-609.

     The firm of Hoopes Brothers & Darlington manufactured wheels
     of all types.  It was founded in 1868 by William and Thomas
     Hoopes.  Stephen B. Darlington joined the firm a short while
     later.  In 1898, William and Thomas Hoopes were still
     partners, but Darlington had been replaced by E.S.
     Darlington.  The firm was located on Market Street just east
     of the railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1868/08/23     Source: "Obituary for L.S. McKinstry" in "Daily
               Local News" (West Chester, March 13, 1940).

     L.S. McKinstry was born on August 23, 1868.  Her parents
     were John and Anna Exton (Steele) Stone.  Her maternal
     grandfather was Hugh E.  Steele, who owned Laurel Iron Works
     and served as president of the Wilmington and Northern
     Railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1870 Source: Shirley Macauley, "W. Chester's squares failed as
     rectangles" in "Daily Local News" (November 13, 1972), 84. 
     NOTE: Centennial issue nø1 of 5 by the Daily Local News

     "Telephones for local service began to be common [in
     America] about 1870, and by 1899, the town even boasted some
     140 long-distance instruments, enabling `daily talks to
     Chicago and Boston, and now and then to St. Louis, the
     communication being carried on with perfect ease.'"

-----------------------------------------
1870s?    Source: Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus Hoopes & Lillian
          Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors, THE HOOPES
          FAMILY RECORD, Vol. I, The First Six Generations
          (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family Organization, Inc.,
          1979), 573.

     Josiah Hoopes of West Chester was a renowned authority on
     evergreen trees and had one strain named after him ("picea
     pungens glauca var Hoopesii," see vol. II, p253, photocopy). 
     He travelled throughout the USA and Europe in search of good
     plant varieties.  During his lifetime, he contributed to
     "The New York Tribune," "The Horticulturist," "Gardener's
     Monthly," "Mechan's Monthly," and other magazines.  Josiah
     was a founder, and for several years the president, of the
     State Horticultural Association of Pennsylvania.  He was a
     vice-president of the American Pomological Society, a member
     of the Academy of Natural Sciences, and honorary member of
     the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, the National
     Society of Brazil, etc.

-----------------------------------------
1871 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     105.

     The Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary founded the
     Villa Maria Academy in West Chester in 1871.  

-----------------------------------------
1871/08/17     Source: "Constitution of the Friends Burial
               Society" (17 August 1871), in Chester County
               Archives, Corporation Book 1, pp372-374.

     Article II: Directors of the FBS were Pierce Hoopes (B19-4),
     Edward H. Hall (B71-2), Caleb E. Chambers (B3-3), William P.
     Marshall (B21-2), Enos Smedley, James Powell (A21-1), Philip
     P. Sharpless (C2-5).

     Article V: regulations on grave markers that specified they
          must lie flat, be made of white stone, be no larger
          than 18" x 16" and contain nothing other than the
          person's name, their birth date and death date.

-----------------------------------------
1871/09/25     Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F. Temple, 1926), 104-105.

     The State Normal School opened on 25 September 1871 under
     Dr. E. H. Cook (1871-1872), Dr. W. A. Chandler (1872-1873),
     Professor G. L. Maris (1873-1881), Dr. George Morris Philips
     (1881-1920), and Dr. Thomas Andrew Smith (1920-? ).

-----------------------------------------
1872      Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of
          Chester County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA: Horace
          F.  Temple, 1926), 167.

     November, 1872 -  The "Daily Local News" became the premier
     daily newspaper in West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1872 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     108.

     Newspapers and founding dates in West Chester: "The Daily
     Local News" (1872).

-----------------------------------------
1874 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 694.

     Josiah Hoopes' doctor, Dr. Charles E. Woodward (1846/01/04-
     ??), was born in Marshallton, attended Westtown Boarding
     School and the College of Pharmacy of Philadelphia, and
     began to practice medicine in West Chester in 1874.  He
     received money from Josiah Hoopes's estate for "professional
     services."

-----------------------------------------
1874 Source: J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, INDEX TO FAMILIES
     AND PERSONS, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA: WITH
     GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (Danbury, PA: Richard
     T. and Mildred Williams, 1971), 226.

     The "White Hall" tavern, owned briefly by Philip P.
     Sharpless from 1838-1839, was torn down in 1874.

-----------------------------------------
1874-1888 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The
          Union History Company, 1898), 967.

     Josiah Hoopes served as the recording secretary of the
     Chester County Agricultural Society from 1874-1888 (JJ: His
     mother died in 1887; father died in 1888).  The CCAS
     disappeared in 1895 when the West Chester State Normal
     School purchased the fairgrounds and declined to hold the
     annual agricultural fair.

-----------------------------------------
1877 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     104.

     In the summer of 1877, after the school was destroyed by a
     tornado that struck its original site, Richard Darlington
     moved the Ercildoun Seminary to a location just outside of
     West Chester and renamed it the Darlington Seminary.  

-----------------------------------------
1877-1931      Source: Heathcote, Charles William.  "History of
               Chester County Pennsylvania" (West Chester, PA:
               Horace F.  Temple, 1926), 167.

     In 1877, W.  Hodgson was the publisher and Wilmer W. 
     Thompson was the editor of the "Daily Local News" of West
     Chester.  
1877 circulation was 4,534
1885  -          6,750
1904  -         14,971
1914  -         15,815
1931  -         11,234 (depression could've caused this)

-----------------------------------------
1881      Source: Robert E. Carlson, compiler and editor, INDEX
          TO CHESTER COUNTY (PENNSYLVANIA) BIOGRAPHY (West
          Chester, 1983), 144.

     Philip M. Sharples (born 1857/08/10; died in Pasadena, CA
     1944/04/13) was a West Chester industrialist who
     manufactured mechanical cream separators at the Sharples
     Separator Co. from 1881.  He loaned Josiah Hoopes money to
     purchase property on Penn Street in West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1883 Source: "Boys were sassy on switchboard" in "Daily Local
     News" (November 14, 1972), 100.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2
     of 5 by the Daily Local News
     Norm Baker, manager of Bell Telephone's West Chester
     operation, claimed that the first telephones in West Chester
     were installed in 1883.  The first customer was the "Morning
     Republican," and others included Hoopes Brothers & Thomas,
     Dr. John R. McClurg, S. A. Kirk, Jerome Gray, "The Daily
     Local," and "The Village Recorder".  The first switchboard
     was installed over William Bell's grocery store at 10 E. Gay
     Street, and Nathan Rambo was the first switchboard operator.
     Boy operators were phased out around 1900 because they were
     "too sassy" to customers, often telling them to wait for a
     connection.

     New telephone installations in the early years were so
     important that they were often covered in front-page news
     stories.  By 1884, there were 50 subscribers and by 1901,
     there were 175.  When the West Chester exchange (Owens) went
     to dial operation on July 15, 1956, there were 12,000
     telephones.  In May 1963, "Owens" became "696."  As of
     January 1, 1972, there were 31,202 telephones in West
     Chester.  In 1971, Bell Telephone employed 400 employees in
     its West Chester facility, with an annual payroll of
     $3,283,567.

-----------------------------------------
1883 Source: Breou's Original Series of Farm Maps, Chester County
     (Philadelphia: W. H. Kirk & Co., 1883), 18-19.
     South Franklin Street ended at Greenfield Alley and East
     Nields Street ended at the PRR tracks.  Linden Street ended
     at Matlack Street.

-----------------------------------------
1883.     Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY
          PENNSYLVANIA AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The
          Union History Company, 1898), 706.

     Josiah Hoopes' dentist, Dr. Robert? M. Scott, took over the
     West Chester dental practice of J. Lewis Baker in 1883,
     following studies at the Dental Department of the University
     of Pennsylvania.  He received money from Josiah Hoopes's
     estate for "professional services."

-----------------------------------------
1884 Source: Shirley Macauley, "W. Chester's squares failed as
     rectangles" in "Daily Local News" (November 13, 1972), 84. 
     NOTE: Centennial issue nø1 of 5 by the Daily Local News
     In 1884, the West Chester Women's Christian Temperance Union
     was founded, the first such group in Chesco.  They met at
     the First Baptist Church.  Sixty women attended the first
     annual meeting.

-----------------------------------------
1885 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 610.

     The Edison Electric Illuminating Company of West Chester was
     organized in 1885.  Abner Hoopes and W. Hoopes were members
     of the original board of directors.  In 1898, Abner Hoopes
     was still a director, along with Samuel Marshall, F.P.
     Darlington, P.E. Jefferis.

-----------------------------------------
1887 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 890.

     The West Chester Board of Trade was organized in 1887, and
     included Abner Hoopes as one of the directors, and Thomas
     Hoopes as its president.

-----------------------------------------
1892/01/20     Source: Daily Local News (January 20, 1892)

     After the borough of West Chester decided to extend East
     Nields Street past the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks to the
     borough line at Bolmar Street, a jury awarded damages of
     $300 to A. D. Sharples and $105 to Pennsylvania Railroad.

-----------------------------------------
1892/04/06     Source: Daily Local News (April 6, 1892)

     East Nields Street crossed the Pennsylvania Railroad "Media
     Line" at "an ugly grade crossing" near the engine house. 
     The extension of East Nields Street offered a convenience to
     farmers from southeast of town.

-----------------------------------------
1892/04/22     Source: Daily Local News (April 22, 1892)

     John Ryan worked for Patrick King directing the workmen who
     graded South Franklin Street through King's property.  King
     expected the borough to annex the property and extend South
     Franklin Street in the summer 1892.

-----------------------------------------
1892/09/19     Source: Daily Local News (September 19, 1892)

     The neighbors on South Franklin Street complained about the
     smell emanating from the fill used to extend East Nields
     Street and/or South Franklin Street.  The author of this
     editorial claimed that the most vile refuse from West
     Chester's alleys was used as fill, including "rotten
     tomatoes, fruit, etc." and "old oyster shells."

-----------------------------------------
1892/09/30     Source: Daily Local News (September 30, 1892)

     The borough of West Chester announced plans to extend South
     Franklin Street to the city line at Rosedale Avenue.  This
     required two bridges over Goose Creek at the intersection of
     South Franklin Street and Linden Street, because the creek
     made an abrupt right-angle turn at that point.

-----------------------------------------
1893      Source: "Obituary of E.L. McKinstry" in "Daily Local
          News," (West Chester, March 30, 1951).

     E.L. McKinstry joined the "Morning Republican" as a
     reporter.  In 1893, he became a reporter for "Daily Local
     News".

-----------------------------------------
1893 Source: Samuel T. Wiley, BIOGRAPHICAL AND PORTRAIT
     CYCLOPEDIA OF CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, COMPRISING A
     HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE COUNTY (Philadelphia, Richmond IN &
     Chicago IL: Gresham Publishing Company, 1893), 264.

     Josiah Hoopes was the "senior member of the great nursery
     firm of Hoopes Brother & Thomas of West Chester."

-----------------------------------------
1893/06   Source: "Obituary for L.S. McKinstry" in "Daily Local
          News" (West Chester, March 13, 1940).

     In June 1893, Loraine Stone McKinstry married Edwin L. 
     McKinstry.  Shortly after her marriage, she became a
     reporter for "Daily Local News".

-----------------------------------------
1893/07/06     Source: Daily Local News (July 6, 1893)
     West Chester Streets Commissioner Eachus led an inspection
     of the East Nields Street extension.  At the time, a gang of
     mostly Irish laborers were clearing brush and briars from
     the "jungle" on the Pennsylvania Railroad property.  They
     obtained fill dirt to raise East Nields Street to the level
     of the railroad from an excavation for an alley on property
     owned by P. J. Jefferis, which ran from Matlack to Walnut
     Streets between Nields and Lacy Streets.

-----------------------------------------
1893/09/12     Source: Daily Local News (September 12, 1893)
     The borough of West Chester built a "substantial bridge" on
     East Nields Street over the small creek just east of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad tracks.

-----------------------------------------
1894/06/29     Source: notes, not dated, not signed

     Robert E. Monaghan born 1822/07/24  died 1894.06/29.  was
     uncle of R. Jones Monaghan.  son of James Monaghan by second
     wife, Catherine Streeper.  born West Fallowfield.  father
was
     from County Fermagh.  Came to America about 1799.  R.E.
     Monaghan taught school, represented CC in state legislature,
     was one of the original promoters of Public School System. 
     ran for US Congress in 1868, lost to Washington Townsend. 
     Invented machine called Vox Populi. 

-----------------------------------------
1894/03/05     Source: Editorial in "Daily Local News" (March 5,
               1894)

     The lot at the corner of Union Street and South Franklin
     Street was swampy and a potential source of malaria.  The
     author of this editorial urged the city to drain it.

-----------------------------------------
1894/10/05     Source: Daily Local News (October 5, 1894)

     Water pipes were laid from East Nields Street north along
     South Adams Street for a single square.

-----------------------------------------
1898 Source: "Oxford resident built first car" in "Daily Local
     News" (November 13, 1972), 49.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø1
of
     5 by the "Daily Local News"

     Burton D. Murdaugh (1875-1944) of Oxford built the first
car,
     a small gasoline-powered buggy that ran on bicycle wheels
and
     chains, in Chester County (pictured) in 1898.  Later, he
moved
     to West Chester, married Mary Swayne in 1906, and fathered
two
     sons, Clem and Joe Murdaugh.  Clem later became a national
     motorcycle champion.

-----------------------------------------
1898 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 978.

     Hoopes Brothers & Thomas dealt mostly in fruit and
ornamental
     plants.  They began to use mail order and sent salesmen all
     over the country.  In 1898, they had a branch office in
     Nashville, TN; they had 600 acres under cultivation, and
they
     employed about 100 people during the "packing season" (JJ:
     probably springtime for ornamentals; autumn for fruit).

-----------------------------------------
1898 Source: W. W. Thompson, editor, CHESTER COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA
     AND ITS PEOPLE (Chicago and New York: The Union History
     Company, 1898), 349.

     "West Chester was known far and wide as being friendly to
the
     slave ... it is largely for this reason that so many colored
     people have made and now make this city their home.  They
now
     constitute about one fourth of the population, have a ward
of
     the city practically all to themselves, and have had
     representatives in the Council."  (JJ: This was in 1898. 
See
     population statistics from p484.)

-----------------------------------------
1899 Source: Shirley Macauley, "W. Chester's squares failed as
     rectangles" in "Daily Local News" (November 13, 1972), 84. 
     NOTE: Centennial issue nø1 of 5 by the Daily Local News

     "Telephones for local service began to be common about 1870,
     and by 1899 the town even boasted some 140 long-distance
     instruments, enabling `daily talks to Chicago and Boston,
and
     now and then to St. Louis, the communication being carried
on
     with perfect ease.'"

-----------------------------------------
1901 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
104.

     Richard Darlington sold the Darlington Seminary (former
     Ercildoun Seminary) to Frank P. Bye, one-time Superintendent
     of Schools in Chester County, who continued to operate the
     school up to the time of publication of this book.

-----------------------------------------
1901/12/16     Source: Daily Local News (December 17, 1901)

     Fire destroyed the "small one-story frame building on
Franklin
     street south of Linden street, occupied for years by the
late
     Patrick King and his wife Ellen."  The fire broke out at
10pm
     on 16 December.  An alarm was sounded from Box 33 at the
     corner of Matlack and Lacy Streets, and although it was too
     late to save the house, the Fame Fire company got a chance
to
     practice with "its chemical cart."

     Mrs. King had left the previous Saturday for her former home
     in Dublin, Ireland, so she was not at home when the blaze
     broke out.  "It is supposed that the fire was caused by some
     of the boys of the southern portion of town.  Mrs. King had
     her own troubles with them and many of them have been
     previously arrested and fined by the Burgess for molesting
     her."

     The value of the house was estimated at $500 and the value
     of the furnishings at $100.

-----------------------------------------

1901 Source: Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A
     HISTORY (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes
     Bros. & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
     Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors,
     THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh and Eighth
     Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family Organization,
     Inc., 1979), 252-253.

     Hoopes Bros. & Thomas opened an office in the Stephen Girard
     Building in Philadelphia.  (JJ: Get a photo or picture of
the
     building).  His sales staff served Pennsylvania, New Jersey,
     Delaware, Maryland and Virginia; plus parts of New York and
     New England.

-----------------------------------------
1902/01/16     Source: Daily Local News (January 16, 1902)

     A new plank crossing was built at the railroad crossing on
     Franklin Street.

-----------------------------------------
1904 Source: Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A
     HISTORY (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes
     Bros. & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
     Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors,
     THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh and Eighth
     Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family Organization,
     Inc., 1979), 252.

     In 1904, the Thomas interest in the firm Hoopes Bros. &
     Thomas was sold off. 

-----------------------------------------
1905 Source: "Adventure called first drivers" in "Daily Local
     News" (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2
     of 5 by the Daily Local News
     Warren Baldwin built an automobile in West Chester by 1901,
     but appears to have done this as an experiemnt, not a
     commercial venture.

-----------------------------------------
1905 Source: "Adventure called first drivers" in "Daily Local
     News" (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2
     of 5 by the Daily Local News

     Burton Murdaugh manufactured a few automobiles between 1899
     and about 1905.

-----------------------------------------
1905 Source: "Adventure called first drivers" in "Daily Local
     News" (November 14, 1972), 108.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2
     of 5 by the Daily Local News

     The first automobile owner in West Chester was Joseph H.
     Sager, who bought a Locomobile in New York City for $850 and
     brought it to West Chester in 1899.

-----------------------------------------
1905/10/20     Source: Chester Country Trust Company, "The first
               and partial account" (West Chester, 8 February
               1906), in Chester County Archives, Will nø29810.

     The remainder of Josiah Hoopes' estate was auctioned off on
     1905/10/20.  D.M. Golder was the auctioneer.  The auction
was
     advertised in both the Public Ledger and the Local News of
     West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1906/01/22     Source: Daily Local News (January 22, 1906)

     South Adams Street was unpaved for a half block between
Market
     and Miner Streets.  It had no sidewalk at all.

-----------------------------------------
1906/04/18     Source: Daily Local News (April 18, 1906)

     West Chester Streets Commissioner John C. Heed announced
that
     improvements would be made to E. Union Street at the PRR
     crossing.  The PRR decided to leave an at-grade crossing, so
     West Chester borough opted to raise the street level and
pave
     it.  This was an improvement for the horse teams that
carried
     freight away from the PRR freight station on E. Union
Street.
     The same article mentioned that the East Barnard Street
     "underhead" bridge was not yet finished.

-----------------------------------------
1907 Source: Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A
     HISTORY (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of Hoopes
Bros.
     & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus
Hoopes
     & Lillian Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors, THE
HOOPES
     FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh and Eighth Generations
     (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family Organization, Inc.,
1979),
     252.

     Charles Cattrell and Wilmer W. Hoopes became partners in the
     firm of Hoopes Bros. & Thomas., Co., which was formally
     incorporated in 1907.

-----------------------------------------
1907/03/26     Source: "Application of Hoopes Brothers and Thomas
               Co." (26 March 1907), in Chester County Archives,
               Corporation Book 6, p143.

     Josiah Hoopes' company was reorganized after his death as
     follows:

Shareholder         residence                shares  value   %
Abner Hoopes        West Chester               20    2000   20
Wilmer W. Hoopes    West Chester               10    1000   10
Charles E. Cattrell 236 S. 38th Street, Phila. 10    1000   10
Henry S. Cattrell   2315 Delancey St., Phila.  50    5000   50
Harvey Gourley      Melrose Park, MontCo.      10     100   10

Directors: Wilmer W. Hoopes, Harvey Gourley, Henry S. Cattrell
Application made by Abner Hoopes, Wilmer W. Hoopes and Charles E.
     Cottrell on 26 March 1907. 

Purpose of business: everything to do with raising plants

-----------------------------------------
1909/12/24     Source: Daily Local News (December 24, 1909)

     Burgess P. E. Jefferis offered a prize of $100 to be awarded
     in the summer.  It is not clear from the article, but the
     prize appeared to be offered to neighborhood beautification
     efforts.  Recently, the borough paved the 500 block of South
     Franklin Street with "white oyster shells only."  An unnamed
     resident of who had lived there for 14 years (1895-1909)
     claimed that this was the first time in his memory that the
     city had worked on South Franklin Street, that it was the
only
     street in the borough paved white, and that he would
encourage
     his neighbors to apply for the prize.

-----------------------------------------
1910 Source: W. Andrew Boyd, compiler and publisher, BOYD'S WEST
     CHESTER DIRECTORY FOR 1910-1911  (West Chester PA &
     Washington DC: W. Andrew Boyd, August 1910), 164.

     The three fireboxes nearest to Riggtown (West Chester) in
     1910 were located at South Matlack and East Lacey Streets
     (firebox #3-3), at High and East Nields Street (#3-5), and
     at South Franklin and Union Streets (#3-6).

-----------------------------------------
1911 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     106.

     In 1911, Dr. George M. Philips of the State Normal School
     played a large part in drawing up the School Code to
     standardize public education in the county.  

-----------------------------------------
1912 Source: "Baldwin founds firm" in "Daily Local News"
     (November 14, 1972), 82.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2 of 5 by
     the Daily Local News

     Kinzer Baldwin, son of Walter C. Baldwin who founded the
     Baldwin Electric Shop at 20« S. Church Street, was pictured
     with other men from his firm as they installed an air raid
     siren on the roof of an auditorium at Church and Washington
     Streets in West Chester in 1941.  Walter Baldwin opened his
     business in 1912, and moved to its present location at 30 E.
     Market Street in 1918.  He died in 1923 and his son Kinzer
     took over until he died in 1952.  Kinzer married Amanda, and
     was succeeded by his son Robert J. Baldwin, who was in turn
     joined in the family business by his son Richard J. Baldwin. 
     In 1972, the company employed five men and one woman.  (From
     deeds, we know that both Walter C. and his son Kinser owned
     the house at 387 E. Nields Street at some time.)

-----------------------------------------
1914 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     105.

     In 1914, the Villa Maria Academy moved from West Chester to
     its present location at Immaculata and was chartered by the
     state of Pennsylvania in 1921.

-----------------------------------------
1914-1919 Source: Extract from George P. Donehoo, PENNSYLVANIA, A
          HISTORY (n.d. [pre-1919]), concerning the firm of
          Hoopes Bros. & Thomas Nursery Co., in Gerald R. Fuller,
          June Markus Hoopes & Lillian Fredsall Webster,
          compilers and editors, THE HOOPES FAMILY RECORD, Vol.
          II, The Seventh and Eighth Generations (Houston, Texas:
          The Hoopes Family Organization, Inc., 1979), 253.

     The Hoopes Bros. & Thomas facility includes packing houses
     that cover more than 1.5 acres, a packing crate
     manufacturing facility, a scion orchard, and "broad fields
     of trees, shrubs and plants (that) speak most effectively
     for the business of doing one thing well for more than sixty
     years."

-----------------------------------------
1917/fall Source: "Balloons lifted Schramm stock" in "Daily Local
          News" (November 14, 1972), 59.  NOTE: Centennial issue
          nø2 of 5 by the Daily Local News

     In fall 1917, the company of "Chris. Schramm & Sons" got a
     contract to produce machinery for lowering aerial balloons. 
     The bought a building from the West Chester Engine Company
     to house the operation.

     The Schramm company was founded in Philadelphia in 1900 to
     make air compressors.  By 1908, they had perfected the first
     portable air compressor which became widely used in the
     construction industry.

     In 1917, the firm was reorganized as Chris. D. Schramm and
     Son, and in 1922 the name was shortened to Schramm, Inc.
     During WWII, Schramm built "much-needed generator sets and
     welders in addition to regular compressors."
     By 1972, Schramm employed 350 people at its 33-acre site in
     West Goshen Township.

-----------------------------------------
1918 Source: Shirley Macauley, "W. Chester's squares failed as
     rectangles" in "Daily Local News" (November 13, 1972), 84. 
     NOTE: Centennial issue nø1 of 5 by the Daily Local News
     The Boy Scouts were chartered in Chester County.  Their
     headquarters was located in the Farmers and Mechanics
     Building in West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1920 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 90.

     Later, a covered wooden bridge was constructed at Chadd's
     Ford (date unknown) and in 1920-1921, a concrete bridge was
     built at a cost of about $78,000.

-----------------------------------------
1921 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     105.

     The Villa Maria Academy at Immaculata was chartered by the
     state of Pennsylvania in 1921.

-----------------------------------------
1923/10   Source: Daily Local News (November 10, 1923)

     The Lawrence B. Doran brickyard in West Chester (Riggtown)
     added a second block manufacturing machine, increasing their
     output to 2000 bricks per day.  The Pennsylvania Railroad
     has also added a siding to serve the brickyard.  There are
     many similar brickyards throughout the region and all seem
     to be oing a good business.

-----------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     104.

     The Darlington Seminary operated in West Chester under
     Superintendent Frank B. Bye, since 1901.

-----------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926),
     105.

     The State Normal School originally possessed ten acres of
     land, but by 1926 it had about sixty acres.  Construction
     costs of the buildings was around $1,000,000.

-----------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 31.

     There is an excellent public school system, one of the best
     in the state.  The Friends maintain well-organized schools. 
     There is also a fine parochial school system organized from
     the grades to the high school inclusive.  One of the best
     State Normal Schools in the United States is located here,
     having a student body of twelve hundred.  

-----------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 31.

     It is served by two branches of the Pennsylvania Railroad
     and several bus and trolley lines.  Its beautiful homes and
     shaded streets make West Chester a delightful town."

-----------------------------------------
1926 Source: Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 31.

     Its important industries are,--automobile wheels, tags,
     nurseries, mushroom canneries, air compressors and cream
     separators. 

-----------------------------------------
1927 Source: Shirley Macauley, "W. Chester's squares failed as
     rectangles" in "Daily Local News" (November 13, 1972), 84. 
     NOTE: Centennial issue nø1 of 5 by the Daily Local News
     The Girl Scouts were chartered in Chester County at the
     suggestion of Mrs. Herbert Hoover following a "tea" held at
     the home (named "Greystone") of Mrs. P. M. Sharples.

-----------------------------------------
1928 Source: Advertisement in "Daily Local News" (November 14,
     1972), 34.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2 of 5 by the Daily
Local
     News

     Schramm, Inc. opened in West Chester in 1928.  The address
was
     800 E. Virginia Avenue and the telephone was 696-2500.

-----------------------------------------
1929 Source: "Chef's browning secrets founds firm" in "Daily
Local
     News" (November 14, 1972), 67.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2
of
     5 by the Daily Local News

     Grocery Store Products Company was founded sometime after
WWI. 
     Grocery Store Products entered West Chester in 1929 when
they
     purchased the Edward H. Jacobs Co., producer of mushrooms. 
     They marketed mushrooms nationally under the brand name
"BinB"
     (Broiled in Butter), processed at facilities in West Chester
     and Kennett Square.  The company's executive and sales
offices
     were located in West Chester in 1972, even though the
company
     was purchased by The Clorox Company of Oakland CA in 1971.

-----------------------------------------
1931 Source: "Mushrooms face 58 failures" in "Daily Local News"
     (November 14, 1972), 13.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2 of 5 by
     the Daily Local News

     The Mushroom Growers Cooperative Association was formed in
     1931 under the leadership of William Maule.  Even before
that,
     Edward H. Jacob founded a mushroom firm in West Chester that
     became, after his death, part of the Grocery Store Products
     Company.  The Borden Company had an interest in the
Brandywine
     Mushroom Corporation of West Chester.

-----------------------------------------
1931/09/11     Source: "Roaring Oil Blaze Perils Crown Here;
Three
               Are Injured" in DLN (September 12, 1931), 1 & 10.

     This is the account of the "Goose Creek Fire" which spread
     from East Nields Street to asphalt tanks owned by the
     Bituminous Service Company at East Union Street and the PRR
     crossing.  The fire broke out at 6:50pm and burned for three
     hours.

     "A match, a cigarette or a spark from a brush fire falling
on
     the usually placid waters of Goose Creek, a small stream
     running the length of the eastern end of town, set off the
     conflagratio.  The creek had an hour or so previously being
     (sic) transformed into a stream of oil when two 10,850
gallon
     tanks at the Bituminous Company service year, fell from the
     supports and breaking, leaked into the water."
     "Frame houses on Magnolia street and a row of brick and
frame
     houses on South Franklin street were seriously threatened by
     the fire.  Sparks also flew across the railroad to the coal
     shed of J. Leon Haggerty, the P. R. R. freight station and
the
     lumber yard of Hoffman and Baldwin.

     "The buildings in greatest danger were those along the creek
     on South Franklin street.  Wooden fences bordering the
stream
     were set ablaze and the fire worked towards the houses with
     unbelievable rapidity. ... Sparks, however, set fire to the
     rear kitchen roofs of the homes of Lawrence Hamilton,
William
     Montgomery and Nathan Shur."  Nathan Shur (506 South
     Franklin Street) lost a small building at the rear of his
     house which housed 25-30 chickens.  Lawrence Hamilton (Jr)
     lived at (520 South Franklin Street) in the 1970s. 

     NOTE: the article mentions "several airplanes [that] circled
     above the crowd and took pictures of the fire before
     darkness settled."

     George J. Moses was the West Chester fire chief.

     Another small sidebar mentioned Jackie McCallin of 222 Lacey
     Street who owned a dog named Jonah.  Jonah fell into Goose
     Creek and got soaked with oil, so his owner had to keep him
     away from the fire.

     There was also a quotation by William Patton, colored, of
307
     South Franklin Street.

-----------------------------------------
1936/05   Source: Gerald R. Fuller, June Markus Hoopes & Lillian
          Fredsall Webster, compilers and editors, THE HOOPES
          FAMILY RECORD, Vol. II, The Seventh and Eighth
          Generations (Houston, Texas: The Hoopes Family
          Organization, Inc., 1979), 250-251.

     Josiah Morgan Hoopes, son of Josiah Hoopes, first married
     Emily Techurst Hervey (spelling differs with notes from
volume
     I, p574) of Lindenwold, NJ (1914/03/22-1936/05/14). 
However,
     she died following the birth of their daughter Emily
Patricia,
     and Josiah Morgan remarried a few months later.  He married
     Ruth Sober (born in Baltimore on 1913/06/10), a registered
     nurse at the Chester County Hospital.  

     They had two children: Jane Anne (born in WC, 1941/05/24),
who
     married Louis Rambo on 1961/02/18; Sarah Linda Hoopes (born
     1944/02/14 in WC), who married George Judson Nye, Jr. at the
     Calvary Lutheran Church in WC on 1962/07/14.

-----------------------------------------
1940      Source: "Obituary for L.S. McKinstry" in "Daily Local
          News" (West Chester, March 13, 1940).

     L.S. McKinstry was a member of the First Presbyterian Church
     of West Chester, where she was a Sunday School teacher.  She
     was also a member of the Brandywine Grange, Patrons of
     Husbandry, New Century Club, Children's Aid Society, and the
     Treasurer of Wentworth Home.

-----------------------------------------
1940      Source: "Obituary for L.S. McKinstry" in "Daily Local
          News" (West Chester, March 13, 1940).

     Loraine Stone McKinstry's son was Hugh Exton McKinstry.  He
     was an alumnus of West Chester High School, Haverford
College,
     Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of
     Technology. 

-----------------------------------------
1942/07   Source: "National Foam started with fire hoses in 1819"
          in "Daily Local News" (November 14, 1972), 85.  NOTE:
          Centennial issue nø2 of 5 by the Daily Local News

     National Foam Systems Inc. began as a manufacturer of fire-
     fighting hose in Boston.  In July 1942, the firm opened a
     plant in West Chester to produce fire-fighting foam for the
     navy.

-----------------------------------------
1944/07/17     Source: Daily Local News (July 17, 1944)

     Green Field was built on land donated to the borough by
     realtor Harry F. Taylor, on the condition that it was named
     after the prominent local family.  The article mentioned
that
     Greenfield Park stood at the edge of the Riggtown section,
     which contained many children.

-----------------------------------------
1944/08/05     Source: Daily Local News (August 5, 1944)

     Green Field required many loads of fill in the swampy area
     around Goose Creek.  A local resident, Joseph Cotter,
     supervised the placement of truckloads of fill.  He
     constructed a small shack for his own use at the site, and
     marked it with a sign to "Keep Out" to deter local vandals.

-----------------------------------------
1945/02/17     Source: Daily Local News (February 17, 1945)

     Joseph Carter supervised the grading and distribution of
fill
     in the "Riggins Lot" (Green Field) just south of Goose
Creek. 
     There were plans to build a cannery there to supplement the
     cannery already in operation along the railway in
Willistown. 
     The fill came from rubbish collections in the neighborhoods
     adjoining Goose Creek.  

-----------------------------------------
1948 Source: "Aeroprojects uses ultrasound" in "Daily Local News"
     (November 14, 1972), 7.  NOTE: Centennial issue nø2 of 5 by
     the Daily Local News

     Aeroprojects Incorporated was founded in 1948 by J. Byron
     Jones to conduct research in high frequency sound--
     ultrasonics.  Although Jones was not originally from West
     Chester, he located the firm on East Rosedale Avenue because
     "it has so many attractions as a home and because it is
     conveniently located for business."

-----------------------------------------
1951      Source: "Obituary of E.L. McKinstry" in "Daily Local
          News" (West Chester, March 30, 1951).

     E.L. McKinstry was a member of: the West Chester Lodge No. 
     322 Free and Accepted Masons, West Chester Lodge No.  42
     Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Brandywine Grange,
     No.  60, Patrons of Husbandry.

-----------------------------------------
1951      Source: "Obituary of E.L. McKinstry" in "Daily Local
          News," (West Chester, March 30, 1951).

     E.L. McKinstry's son was Dr.  Hugh Exton McKinstry.  In
     1951, he was a geologist and member of faculty of Harvard
     University.

-----------------------------------------
1954/04/19     Source: Daily Local News (April 19, 1954)

     The West Chester Borough extended East Nields Street from
     Adams Street to the borough line at Bolmar Street. 

-----------------------------------------
1964 Source: Walsh J.J., UNDERSTANDING PARAPLEGIA (J. B.
     Lippincott Company, 1964), 3.

     In conformity with the notable speeding up of progress in
     other branches of medicine, and indeed, in other sciences
     and technologies, which has marked the last two decades, our
     understanding and treatment of the special problems of
     paraplegia have advanced tremendously.  The death rate from
     paraplegia has greatly decreased.  Less than 8% of the
     people who have paraplegia die, over 85% get employed after
     rehabilitation program.

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