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History of the West Chester Railroad from 1894-1906

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This file contains assorted facts from Chester County history collected by students in the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

This file has not been completely proofread, nor have the sources been verified, so use this material with caution.

Collected by Jim Jones, David Flogaus, Kelly Kulp-Bosler, Mike Wolford and Bob Gialanella (Spring 1995). Additional information collected by Daniel Cleary, John Morrison, Scott Harre, and Robert Troutman (Spring 1996); and by Nicole Bowman, Karin Flippin, Mary Kurtak, Kelly McVeigh, Wendy Smoker, and Brian Toombes (Spring 1997). Last edited by Jim Jones (August 9, 1997).

Special thanks to Don Callander of the West Chester Railroad Company for providing notes, photocopies and other materials.



1894/03/03     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 3, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     There was a penny scale at the train station, but it was out
     of order.  The author asked if this was due to something he
     observed some time ago, when a group of small boys put a
     single penny in the scale, and then each jumped on the scale
     in place of the previous boy before the scale could reset. 
     In this way, they all got weighed for a single penny.

------------------------
1894/03/28     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 28, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     Miller Snare was retired from the PRR by this time.  He was
     in bad health (and according to the death register, died in
     the following month).

------------------------
1894/03/28     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 28, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     William Munshower represented the Union News Company at the
     station.

------------------------
1894/05/03     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 3, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     James Wallace, an ex-policeman and ex-employee of the
     Customs House in Philadelphia, replaced Miller Snare as the
     general assistant and messenger at the PRR station.  The
     station master was still W. A. McMichael, and other
     employees included H. A. Gillingham, Walter Keech, conductor
     Edward Miller and baggage master George Guss.

------------------------
1894/05/19     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 19, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     William Gheen was a ticket agent at the PRR station.

------------------------
1894/06/21     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 21, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     One train operated with conductor Marsh, baggage master
     Frank S. Wetsel and flagman Robert Cunningham.

------------------------
1894/07/11     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 11, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     Another train operated under the control of conductor Shaw
     and baggage man Isaac Jones.  Shaw was replaced by John
     Kerwin.  Also, George Mendenhall was on sick leave because
     his foot was run over by a milk car.

------------------------
1894/07/17     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 17, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     Howard A. Gillingham was the ticket agent at the PRR
     station.  Clark Pyle was the "night operator."  This article
     also mentioned George Guss, Mrs. Lamborn, and the baggage
     master Jesse Wilson.

------------------------
1894/08/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 20, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     The workers at the PRR station made preparations for "the
     handling of trunks next Monday when the Normalites return." 
     (Normalites were the students and faculty at the West
     Chester Normal School.)

------------------------
1894/09/04     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 4, 1894), from the
               CCHS clippings file. 

     The conductor on the PRR Frazer Branch was Joseph Keech, and
     the baggage master of the PRR station on Market Street was
     Jesse Wilson.

------------------------
1894/10/15     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 15, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     David E. Townsend was the ticket collector at the PRR
     station.

------------------------
1894/11/06     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 6, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     George Guss, the baggage master at the PRR station, left to
     work for an electrical firm in Philadelphia, after two years
     in West Chester.

------------------------
1894/11/08     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 8, 1894), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     Mr. Rigg of Clifton briefly served as baggage master at the
     PRR station after George Guss, but gave up after a few weeks
     due to illness.

------------------------
1894/11/12     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 12, 1894), from the
               CCHS clippings file. 

     E. Harvey Hummell was the new baggage master at the PRR
     station on Market Street.

------------------------
1894/11/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 16, 1894), from the
               CCHS clippings file. 

     Josiah Burnett was head of the freight warehouse at the PRR
     station.  He was assisted by Frank Burnett and Isaac Smiley.

------------------------
1894/12/18     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 18, 1894), from the
               CCHS clippings file. 

     The old Pennsylvania Railroad station at Matlack and Gay
     Street was no longer in service and stood empty.

------------------------
1894/12/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 24, 1894), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     The PRR-Phoenixville is only 11 miles long, but it is one of
     the most useful lines in the PRR system because it allows
     freight to bypass Philadelphia.

------------------------
1895 no. section 36, LAWS OF PENNSYLVANIA (Busch, State Printer,
     1895).

     No railroad or steamboat or any other type of transportation
     shall accept or move a body unless there has been a burial
     permit issued by the Board of Health. .

------------------------
1895/03/18     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 18, 1895), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     This was a complaint about "colored" boys who loafed at the
     train station, used bad language and littered the floor with
     peanut shells.

------------------------
1895/03/20     "Last Night Was Rather Cool for Sleeping Out of
               Doors" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 20, 1895), from
               the CCHS clippings file. 

     This article contained an anonymous conversation with a
     blue-collar laborer from Chester.  He took the train to West
     Chester and slept outdoors upon arrival.  He had heard that
     he might get work at a nursery.

------------------------
1895/03/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 27, 1895), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     PRR Conductor Milton Shaw.  Conductor Marsh and Engineer
     John Richards.

------------------------
1895/04/02     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 2, 1895), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     Sharp Griffith got a new job at the PRR freight station.

------------------------
1895/05/25     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 25, 1895), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     H. Jesse Wilson was promoted to conductor on the PRR.

------------------------
1895/06/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 24, 1895), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     William Gheen was the assistant to ticket agent Gillingham. 
     McMichael was still the PRR station master, and two other
     employees were named Wallace and Sweney.

------------------------
1898/03/07     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 7, 1898), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     Josiah Burnett was an invalid after 25 years working for the
     PRR.

------------------------
1898
     News (February 28, 1988).

     John Frederick Lewis (1860-1932/12/24), a lawyer from
     Philadelphia, built a country home near Zermatt station on
     the PRR-Frazer just before the turn of the century and
     "supposedly named his estate after his ancestral home in
     Germany," Morstein.  His regular home was at 1914 Spruce
     Street in Philadelphia.  He served as the first chairman of
     the Philadelphia sesquicentennial committee for the
     Declaration of Independence, but resigned after a dispute
     with city officials.  He became known as an art collector,
     and left an estate of more than one million dollars when he
     died.

------------------------
1899/01/02     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 2, 1899), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     The electric trolley from WC to 63rd Street in Philadelphia
     started operation, but was delayed by a snowstorm on its
     inaugural run.  The trolley cost 25 one-way, and departed
     roughly once an hour.  William M. Hayes was the president of
     the West Chester Electric Railway.  In a section that
     mentions connections to other lines, this article indicates
     that the WC-Lenape trolley line was already in operation,
     under separate ownership.

------------------------
1899/04/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, April 5, 1899)
               from the CCHS clippings file "West Chester
               Transportation, PRR"

     Names of men who worked for the PRR: Josiah Burnett (JJ:
     probably junior, since Josiah Burnett was an invalid in
     1898/03/07) was the "head man," assisted by Millard Snare,
     Michael Reagan and John Ryan.

------------------------
1900/01/02     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 2, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file. 

     According to an advertisement by John Wanamaker of
     Philadelphia, the electric trolley from WC to Philadelphia
     took 1h48 each way and cost 30 cents each way.

------------------------
1900/01/07     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 8, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     The largest locomotive ever to visit West Chester arrived on
     the PRR-Frazer last evening.  "The engine which came in was
     No. 268, one of the immense new heaps of iron and steel
     which were recently placed on the line."  The run was made
     very slowly so that the crew could test overhead clearances
     and bridge weight capacity along the line.  There was only a
     few inches of clearance at the Gay Street bridge in West
     Chester.

------------------------
1900/01/12     "West Chester and Philadelphia, Schedule in
               Effect" (Pennsylvania Railroad, November 19,
               1899), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     This was the schedule that Chris Sanderson saw around the
     time he finished at the West Chester State Normal School. 
     The Philadelphia terminal was Broad Street station, and
     there were 26 trains a day to Philadelphia, and 27 trains a
     day to West Chester.  Fourteen of the WC-P trains and
     thirteen of the P-WC trains ran on the PR-Frazer tracks,
     while the rest ran on the "Central Division."

     There are connections via Frazer and the Main Line to
     Lancaster, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh by express.  There were
     also seven daily and four Sunday trains to Downingtown.  The
     last itme shows five daily trains to Phoenixville departing
     at 5:54am, 7:35am, 9:14am, 3:13pm, and 4:52pm.  JJ: The
     schedule doesn't say this, but it looks like the round-trip
     from West Chester to Phoenixville and back took about 1:40,
     so a one-way trip must have been around fifty minutes.  With
     that, we can construct the Phoenixville-West Chester
     schedule and see how Chris Sanderson and his mom kept in
     touch by mail.

------------------------
1900/01/27     "Lockers for Trainmen" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (January 27, 1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     A space was filled with lockers for railroad workers at the
     Market Street Station in West Chester, providing them with a
     place to store their individual equipment.

------------------------
1900/02/02     "Arrangements Made for a Reading Room at the
               Market Street Depot" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February
               2, 1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     The PRR began to install a reading room on the second floor
     of the Market Street station in West Chester for the use of
     off-duty railroad workers.  "There has long been talk of the
     opening of a branch of the P. R. R. Y. M. C. A. in this
     place, there being many railroad men who have their homes
     here and many others who are compelled to remain a short
     time each day, but on account of the many clubs here the
     idea has been found to be almost impracticable and the
     reading room will be installed.  Later it may develop into a
     branch of the organization."

------------------------
1900/02/13     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February 13, 1900), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     The PRR wreck trains were stationed at Parkesburg and Paoli. 
     (This is a story about a ten-car derailment at Hope's tower
     near Pomeroy, involving engine No. 138.

------------------------
1900/02/28     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February 28, 1900), from the
               CCHS clippings file. 

     John F. Ryan, a railway worker, married Mary Hally of "near
     Frazer."  The maid of honor was a Miss Geehan and the
     groomsman was James Farrell.

------------------------
1900/03/01     "Tickets for Commuters" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March
               1, 1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     The approximately 75 people from West Chester who use
     monthly commuter tickets lined up to buy their tickets on
     the first day of the month, creating a long delay as the
     ticket agent marked their name and destination on the
     tickets to two days before the beginning of the month.

------------------------
1900/03/07     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February 7, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A new Bell Telephone booth was placed in the waiting room of
     the West Chester PRR train station at Market Street
     yesterday, and this morning at 4am, Louis Wagner made the
     first call.

------------------------
1900/03/08     "Railroaders Will Open their Reading Rooms To-
               Morrow Evening" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 7,
               1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     The reading room at the PRR station on Market Street in West
     Chester opened in the evening.  "The rooms have been
     handsomely fitted up for the use of the men by the railroad
     company, and everything needful in a modern club room is to
     be found there, including a choice assortment of papers and
     magazines, with other works, which will interest the
     readers.  The rooms are finely finished in hard wood, and
     the floor is neatly carpeted, while easy chairs, divans, and
     other pieces of furniture are placed about the room.  At the
     opening to-morrow evening there will be a literary
     entertainment given by the employees for the amusement of
     their friends.  There will be music, and after the programme
     has been rendered the guests who have been invited will be
     tendered a lunch."

------------------------
1900/03/08     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 8, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     This is a lengthy editorial that praises the PRR for opening
     "The Employees' Reception Room" at the MArket Street station
     in West Chester, which the author called "the beginning of
     an organization for the welfare of of the employees of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad Company and their families, whose
     interests are in West Chester, which the promoters hope will
     be supported by the progressive and thinking element among
     the men, aided, where possible, by the sympathy and concern
     of the traveling public."

------------------------
1900/03/14     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 14, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     By accident, a west-bound freight trained pulled by three
     locomotives sped through a site near Malvern where a track
     crew was at work.  "The train plunged into a truck laden
     with railroad ties and scattered them in all directions,
     none of them falling beneath the wheels.  Italians ran for
     their lives, every one escaping."

------------------------
1900/03/21     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 21, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     This article describes turntables and the facilities for
     storing locomotives overnight on the PRR on the lower track
     in West Chester.  It has room for four locomotives, and
     there are usually four parked outside, plus another four or
     five on the north side of town in the yard near North
     Matlack Street.

     Care of the engines is supervised by Al Hamilton at night
     and Thomas Finegan in the daytime, "both old hands at the
     business."

     "Some of the Neighbors": The nearest roundhouses to West
     Chester are located at Wawa, Oxford, Lamokin, Downingtown
     and Paoli.  The largest and most interesting roundhouse is
     at Powellton Avenue, which is always busy.  "One after
     another of the locomotives come in from Wilmington,
     Balitmore, New York, Pottsville, West Chester and
     Harrisburg.  They are turned, they take their places, they
     are carefully rubbed down, like so many sprinters, and are
     prepared for the track.  There is no confusion, no loud
     talking among the men, but all is in thorough order.  A
     mistake there might mean a loss of a minute, and minutes
     count in the railroad business."

     "When Troubles Come": The worst problem faced in turntable
     operation occurs when a blizzard fills the pit with snow,
     preventing the table from turning.  To prevent the engines
     from becoming trapped in the roundhouse, the railroad
     workers run them out onto the track in the order they will
     depart before the blizzard strikes.

------------------------
1900/03/26     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 26, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     The PRR was trying to buy land south of the Gay Street
     bridge and north of the Market Street station in West
     Chester in order to landscape the approach to the station.

------------------------
1900/03/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 27, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     Residents of West Chester take a shortcut to the PRR station
     at Market Street by climbing the embankment next to the
     railroad bridge at East Barnard Street.  There used to be
     steps on the west side of the tracks, but the PRR removed
     them to discourage people from walking along a dangerous
     part of the tracks.  This morning, a dozen or more
     passengers climbed the bank, and one of them said "It saves
     us about three blocks."

------------------------
1900/04/04     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 4, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     PRR railroad officials, including Superintendent T. 
     Bechdolt of Media, General Superintendent E. F. Brook of the
     Philadelphia, Wilmington and Balitmore Railroad, Civil
     Engineer Alonzo Feldpauche of Philadelphia, and J. G. Ruth
     of Media, Superintendent of the Middle Division, arrived by
     special train (locomotive No. 99 and parlor car No. 2803)
     for a brief surprise inspection of the Market Street station
     and surroundings.  The author of the article reported that
     no one knew for sure, but there was speculation that the
     company wanted to enlarge the railyard to provide more room
     for separate freight and passenger stations, and perhaps to
     straighten the curve under Gay Street.  The article mentions
     that the property west of the railroad and south of Gay
     Street was owned by Charles H. Willis.

------------------------
1900/04/07     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 7, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     Workers on the PRR were engaged in "sprucing up" the North
     Matlack Street yard where the majority of freight arrived in
     WC, because the circus was due to arrive soon and it was
     expected that many people would go to the railyard for a
     first look at the animals.

------------------------
1900/04/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, April 20, 1900)
               from the CCHS clippings file "West Chester
               Transportation, PRR"

     A passenger train was forced to make an unscheduled stop at
     Union Street shortly after leaving the station, because a
     small boy decided to run on the tracks in a footrace against
     the engine.  The engineer stopped to avoid running over the
     boy.  "Just as the locomotive reached the end of the train
     shed the lad sprang upon the track in front of it and made a
     spurt down the track.  The engine was close upon him, but he
     did not falter.  It was a race with the iron machine, and he
     was in it to win.  Such running as that boy did the engineer
     declares he never saw, but before he reached Union street
     crossing the locomotive was gaining to such an extent that
     it was stopped to permit the boy to escape.

------------------------
1900/04/20     "Worked on the Sabbath" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April
               20, 1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     Italian workers labored on Sunday for the PRR between
     Coatesville and Parkesburg.  "Many of the Italian laborers
     worked on the Sabbath, while dozens of others enjoyed the
     day of rest watching their fellow workmen and in smoking
     their pipes about the shanties."

------------------------
1900/05/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 17, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     Fire was discovered in one of the "emigrant cars" of train
     No. 3, which left Broad Stret station at 11:20pm last
     evening.  Emigrant agent Joseph O. Nathanson discovered the
     fire, caused when an oil lamp ignited the headlinings in the
     car and set the roof on fire.  He alerted conductor George
     A. Tullock and brakeman S. S. Douhouer, who stopped the
     train at Paoli.  The Hungarians and the Swedes in the car
     got out in a state of great agitation, and it took a half
     hour to extinguish the fire in car No. 2706.  It had a hole
     burnt through its roof, so it was uncoupled and left at
     Paoli.

------------------------
1900/05/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 26, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A new schedule went into effect for trains between West
     Chester and Philadelphia.  The most important change was
     that trains from West Chester left earlier.

------------------------
1900/06/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 20, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     Baggage agent Elwood Patchell and his assistant, Hayes
     Still, were swamped with work because all of the schools
     were closing at the same time and people wanted their trunks
     checked on the train at the same time.

------------------------
1900/06/25     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 26, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     Track foreman George Dougherty and his crew worked on the
     tracks along the approach to the old Gay Street station from
     Chestnut Street rails, even though some of it was as light
     as 45 pounds/yard and the rest was 65 pounds/yard.  In 1900,
     100 pound rail was in use on the Main Line.

     The article mentioned that Miller Snare was employed by the
     railroad in the old days, back when conductor Edward Miller
     was young.  Miller once ran on the "lower road" (WC&PRR). 
     The article also said that there were men in town who wanted
     to buy the old Gay Street station for use as a YMCA.

------------------------
1900/06/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 27, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     The Paoli wreck train No. 235, had an accident at the
     Bradford Hills Station when it crashed into a freight train
     it was following.  The freight train burst an air hose and
     came to a stop too quickly for the wreck train to avoid it. 
     The cab boss, James Wooten, broke his shoulder and one of
     the workers, Alex Tollinger, sprained his ankle.  The wreck
     train was destroyed, its two tool cars crushed and the front
     of the engine was smashed.

------------------------
1900/07/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 21, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     There was a head-on collision between a passenger train and
     a train loaded with quarry stone near the Glen Mills
     station.  There were a numver of injured people including
     Mrs. Thomas S. Butler (JJ: possibly of West Chester), the
     passenger train conductor Walter D. [looks like] Hansell,
     and the freight train fireman Frank Winterbottom.  The
     passenger train engineer was Smith Lawrence, and J. Silas
     Gravelle of Boston was a passenger.

------------------------
1900/07/20     "Of Coatesville" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 20,
               1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     A gang of more than 100 Italian laborers was employed to
     widen the roadbed of the PRR near Coatesville.

------------------------
1900/07/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 24, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A large force of railroad workers was engaged in replacing
     the rails on the south side of the Market Street station in
     West Chester with heavier rails.

------------------------
1900/07/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 27, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     There was a derailment of a coal train near St. Davids this
     evening after a wheel on one of the leading cars broke,
     smashing 23 more cars and scattering coal all over the four
     tracks.  The conductor was John F. Glass of Harrisburg, and
     the engineer was Cheyney Steele.  The front brakeman, Payne,
     was thrown from the train but survived.  All members of the
     crew praised an unidentified little girl who alerted them as
     they passed the Wayne station that there was trouble in the
     front of the train.

------------------------
1900/08/23     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 23, 1900)

     Elwood Patchell, the baggage agent at the PRR station on
     Market Street, was transferred to West Grove.  He was
     replaced by Mr. Eckley, who came from West Grove.

------------------------
1900/08/30     "113 Leave for the Atlantic" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (August 30, 1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     113 people boarded a PRR excursion train from West Chester
     to Atlantic City.  Two earlier trains carried as much as 200
     people, some of whom remained at the shore for as much as a
     week.  The train left West Chester at 6:45am.

------------------------
1900/09/03     "Railroad Rumblings: Bits of News Picked UP Where
               the Trains Are Running" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (September 3, 1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     "Miss Martha McMichael is becoming familar with the big
     typewriting machine at the Market Street Station, and will
     make out the way bills and manifests thereon." 

     Conductor M. M. Shaw and crew brought a train with thirteen
     empty passenger cars out from Philadelphia late last night,
     after they were used for an excursion to Atlantic City.

     Several passenger cars used in West Chester still have
     stoves for heat, even though all of the passenger cars west
     of the Delaware were equipped with steam heat a year or two
     ago.  This was because the cars on the New Jersey side were
     not yet refitted, and as a result of the heavy summer shore
     excursion traffic, cars from both sides of the river became
     intermingled.

     A train, known as "the educational train" left West Chester
     each morning at 7:35am via the PRR-Frazer line.  School was
     back in session, so the train "was freighted with teachers"
     including Homer Darlington, principal at Paoli; Miss Willa
     M. Way and Miss Sara E. Martin in Berwyn; Mrs. Carrie W.
     Cummins in North Berwyn; Miss Bessie Smedley, Malvern; Miss
     Evaline Darlington, Wayne; Miss Emma Clark, West Whiteland;
     Susan C. Lodge, principal of the Girls' Collegiate Institute
     in Philadelphia,; and other teachers.

------------------------
1900/10/31     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 31, 1900), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     The PRR took steps to stop a fraudulent practice by people
     who shipped their baggae to Philadelphia via the railroad
     and then took the cheaper trolley to Philadelphia, meeting
     their baggage later in the city.

------------------------
1900/11/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 20, 1900), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     This article describes the work to extend a culvert over
     Saalbach's Run on the Main Line near Coatesville.  It
     includes a detailed description of the work gang and an
     offhand reference to a railroad passenger: 

     "The tourist from New York who looks carelessly across the
     landscape to the South Valley Hills, at this point less than
     a mile away, and carelessly tosses from the dining car
     window a jagged, rosy-hued lobstor claw at the end of his
     second course, perhaps has little idea how someone has
     carefully planned the roadbed and many others have labored
     night and day that he may enjoy luxurious travel at high
     speed."

     "There are two stone masons, a couple of bricklayers, an
     Italian who mixes the mortar and a mechanic who dresses the
     stone.  Then there are, besides these, a well-fed chap in
     overalls who runs the engine, a stout young fellow who looks
     after the cable to see that it is never kinked or knotted,
     and a romantic looking brigand with piratical mustache and
     jaunty slouch hat, who carries water all day long to feed
     the boiler or tosses on coal for the furnace.  These and the
     boy with the drinking water complete the gang in charge of
     this portion of the work."  (Note: the "little upright
     engine" and cable were used to position limestone blocks
     used to build the culvert.)

------------------------
1900/11/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 24, 1900), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A fifteen pound can of ordinary gunpowder rests in the
     Market Street depot and no one has claimed it.  The can
     arrived about two years ago, but it has no markings or
     shipping tag.  It was kept next to a window at the rear of
     the building until someone figured out what to do with it.

------------------------
1900/12/10     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 11, 1900), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     Fireman Samuel McComsey fell from his own freight train and
     was run over yesterday evening at Glen Loch.  His leg and
     arm were severed, and he died a half hour later.

------------------------
1900/12/26     "West Chester and Philadelphia, Schedule in
               Effect" (Pennsylvania Railroad, November 25,
               1900), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     There were 25 trains from West Chester to Phila and 26
     trains from Phila to WC use the PRR-Media.  There were
     twelve trains in each direction on Sunday, with five of each
     using the PRR-Media.  There were also connections to
     Wilmington, Oxford, Lamokin (between Wawa & Chester),
     Lancaster, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh.

------------------------
1901/01/01     "Late Trains New Year's Eve Via The Pennsylvania
               Railroad" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 31, 1900),
               from the CCHS clippings file: "Transportation,
               Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     In order to allow people from West Chester to view the
     "illumination of City Hall, Philadelphia, and the other
     electrical displays by which the opening of the twentieth
     century is to be celebrated, and the military demonstration
     late on New Year's Eve, the PRR will run a special train to
     West Chester and intermediate stations, leaving Broad Street
     Station, Philadelphia, at 1 o'clock a. m. on the morning of
     January 1, 1901."

------------------------
1901/02/29     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (February 29, 1901), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A new, unidentified engineer made a record run over the
     seven miles of the PRR-Frazer eight minutes, including stops
     at two stations on the way to WC.

------------------------
1901/04/10     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 10, 1901), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     The PRR purchased large amounts of property west of
     Downingtown for unknown reasons, although the author
     speculated that it might be to block the expansion of
     trolley lines, since "Trolley lines do not have the right of
     eminent domain and could not cross the railroad's property
     as steam roads are able to do."  JJ: See the discussion of
     this tactic in April 1906.

------------------------
1901/04/25     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 25, 1901), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     120 Italian workers were employed by the PRR to replace the
     rails on the PRR-Frazer between Morstein and Greenhill
     stations, a distance of 2.3 miles.  They arrived at the site
     on the first west-bound train of the day, operated by
     conductor Joseph Keech.  The new rails will be the same
     weight as those used on the Main Line.

------------------------
1901/05/06     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 6, 1901), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A court ordered the PRR to build a bridge on the PRR-Frazer
     "between Morstein and the old Halfway House, known in years
     gone by as Dolly Glisson's" over a new road.  John Frederick
     Lewis, Esquire, had a strong interest in obtaining the
     bridge, while it was opposed by William E. Lockwood of Glen
     Loch.

------------------------
1901/05/15     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, May 15, 1901) from
               the CCHS clippings file "West Chester
               Transportation, PRR"

     This article describes the activity on a train from
     Philadelphia to West Chester, and includes comments from the
     conductor about the complexity of the job and the scams
     pulled by passengers: "On the road between West Chester and
     Philadelphia, we have over a dozen different kinds [of
     tickets], not to mention all sorts of bluffs the dead beats
     give us when they are trying to ride free."

     The "straight ticket" costs 73 cents.  The excursion fare,
     "such as a transient traveler uses" cost $1.16 (round trip). 
     The package ticket, sold in groups of at least ten, cost 53
     cents. Clerical tickets were half price, and made available
     to ministers, nuns, and officers of the Volunteers of
     America and the Salvation Army.  A 46-trip booklet for
     students cost $8.74.  A 60-trip booklet, good for a month of
     working days, cost $11.40.  A 100-ticket book cost 22.80 and
     180 rides for $30.80.  There was also something called a
     1000-mile ticket.

------------------------
1901/09/06     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 6, 1901), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     John Frederick Lewis, Esquire and John M of West Goshen
     Township, arranged with the PRR to abolish the grade
     crossing just below Green Hill station and build a tunnel
     for the road under the railroad.  The new bridge, an iron
     truss on stone abutments, eliminated a dangerous grade
     crossing.  The crossing had long been considered dangerous,
     and the article mentions a "Mrs. Smith, the sister of
     William H. Tumbleston, Esq. of Green Hill [who] was killed
     here some years ago."

------------------------
1901/09/09     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 10, 190), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A locomotive pulling a train to West Chester over the PRR-
     Frazer, operated by Conductor Charles Springer, was
     immobilized by a broken eccentric just as it left the
     Morstein station.  There was no damage, but the train was
     delayed for nearly three hours, even though another
     locomotive stood nearby while repairs were made.  The
     workers eventually removed the damaged part and the train
     proceeded to West Chester with only a single operating
     eccentric.

------------------------
1901/09/24     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (September 24, 1901), from the
               CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     Work was underway to replace the grade crossing near Green
     Hill Station with a bridge, and a siding was under
     construction at that station on the east side of the PRR-
     Frazer.

------------------------
1901/10/03     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 3, 1901), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     The PRR planned to build a new water tank at its Chestnut
     Street yard in WC.  This plan pleased local residents
     because it will eliminate the railroad's heavy draw on local
     water supplies when servicing locomotives.  Residents of the
     south end of the borough need a railroad water tank even
     more, since "the draw is really greater on the southern end
     water mains than in the northern portion of the borough."

------------------------
1901/10/11     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 12, 1901), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     A large steam engine crane, capable of lifting locomotives
     weighing 100 tons, was used to remove the old turntable at
     the Chestnut Street yard and install a new one.  The work,
     which required more than 100 men and several supervisors,
     proceeded so quietly that none of the local residents awoke. 
     (Names given included "Chas. H. Pennypacker, Esq.; Col. F.
     C. Hooten, Jas. D. McClellan; Edw. H. Hall, ex-postmaster
     Worth, and others in the vicinity")  

     Meanwhile, another gang of workmen was employed to lay the
     water main to the new railroad water tank.

------------------------
1901/11/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 5, 1901), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad" 

     PRR officials reported that "ride stealers" were fewer this
     fall than at any time in the past 20 years.  They attributed
     this to dilligent effort by railroad detectives and the
     generally good economic situation, which meant that there
     was no excuse for not having a job.  Justices of the Peace
     have also cooperated by sending offenders to jail.

     Railroad detectives faced a new hazard when apprehending
     ride stealers--smallpox.  Since the detectives had to search
     a suspect for weapons, they came into close enough contact
     to become infected.

------------------------
1902/01/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 16, 1902)

     A new plank crossing was built at the railroad crossing on
     Franklin Street.

------------------------
1902/02/28     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, February 28, 1902)
               from the CCHS clippings file "West Chester
               Transportation, PRR"

     Negroes who loitered at the train station were a concern to
     West Chester's citizens.  "I went to meet my sister, coming
     on the 8:10 train, and found the waiting room in possession
     of three negro boys.  The outside of the station was adorned
     by five young negro men.  These men and boys were amusing
     themselves by tapping on the window of the ladies' room, at
     a young girl.  They were constantly making ugly remarks, and
     I found the girl pale and frightened.  As in this case, it
     was absolutely necessary to go out alone sometimes, and it
     is a shame for women to be subjected to such outrages."

------------------------
1902/05/26     "West Chester and Philadelphia, Schedule in
               Effect" (Pennsylvania Railroad, May 25, 1902),
               from the CCHS clippings file: "Transportation,
               Pennsylvania Railroad" 

     There were 25 trains from West Chester to Philadelphia and
     26 trains from Philadelphia to West Chester trains in each
     direction use the PRR-Media.  There were twelve trains in
     each direction on Sunday, with five of each using the PRR-
     Media.  There were also connections to Wilmington, Oxford,
     Lamokin, Lancaster, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh.

------------------------
1902/05/31     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 31, 1902)

     Christian Kautz was the gatekeeper for the PRR at the Market
     Street crossing.

------------------------
1902/06/01     "West Chester Street Railway and Lenape Branch--
               Timetable in Effect after June 1st, 1902", from
               the CCHS clippings file: "Transportation, Time
               Tables"

     There were 34 trolleys a day between West Chester and
     Lenape, operating from 6:30am to 11pm at intervals of
     roughly half an hour to Wilmington, and two on Sundays.  The
     Sunday trolley schedule was the same except that the last
     train from Lenape to West Chester left at 10:30pm instead of
     11pm.  C. V. Miller was the superintendent of the West
     Chester Street Railway.

------------------------
1902/07/21     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 21, 1902)

     A railroad worker, John F. Ryan, died in Philadelphia of
     complications following an accident which crushed his foot a
     few years ago and left an unhealed wound.  He was survived
     by his wife and five children.  He was "brother-in-law of
     Michael, James, and Kate Flanagan and Mrs. Michael Brennan."

------------------------
1902/10/04     clippings file.

     As of October 4, 1902, the West Chester Street Railway
     operated only 15 trolleys each way daily between West
     Chester and Lenape.

------------------------
1902/11/01     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 5.

     On November 1, 1902, the P&BCRR was merged with the
     Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Company to form the
     Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington Railroad (PB&WRR).

------------------------
1902/11/20     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 20, 1902)

     Small boys congregated at the PRR station and West Chester
     trolley stations to earn money carrying baggage for
     returning teachers.  At least one woman reported that her
     baggage was lost as a result.

------------------------
1903/01/08     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 8, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     President A. J. Cassatt of the PRR announced plans to
     construct additional tracks on the PRR Main Line between
     Philadelphia and Lancaster, bringing the total to six tracks
     except where the Main Line crosses the wooden "high bridge"
     in Coatesville.  A new stone bridge is under construction in
     Coatesville to carry additional tracks, but it will not be
     completed for several years.

------------------------
1903/03/23     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 3, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     A car containing coal for Edward H. Hall broke loose on a
     siding on Evans Street, ran downhill towards the Electric
     Light Plant, and passed over Walnut Street without hitting
     anyone.  However, on the other side, it struck another
     railcar and broke off a bumper.

------------------------
1903/03/27     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, March 27, 1903)
               from the CCHS clippings file "West Chester
               Transportation, PRR"

     "A fire, which is supposed to have been started by people
     trespassing upon the property, practically wiped out of
     existence the old West Chester Railroad Depot fronting on
     Gay Street, at an early hour this morning and destroyed an
     adjoining stable."  The old railway station at Gay Street
     was built in the 1850s, but empty and unused by 1903.  The
     frame construction building was owned by Uriah Painter.

------------------------
1903/03/31     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (March 31, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     The PRR announced plans to construct a low-grade freight
     line through Chester County beginning near Parkesburg and
     proceeding across the county parallel to the Delaware county
     line.  The new line would diverge from the PRR-Main Line
     near Caln, cross the Brandywine south of the rpesent bridge,
     head east while climbing Valley Hill, cross under the
     existing tracks at Whitford, and continue on the north side
     of the present track, passing between the Warren Tavern and
     Malvern.

------------------------
1903/07/16     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 17, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     An accident at Whiteland station destroyed four railcars
     carrying granite blocks intended for the construction of the
     PRR's low-grade freight line across Chester County.

------------------------
1903/10/05     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 5, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     The locomotive that normally pulled the train to West
     Chester on the PRR-Frazer was immobilized at the Market
     Street station when it backed into a line of railcars and an
     extension punctured the water tank on the tender.

------------------------
1903/10/19     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 20, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     The PRR proposed to build a "low-grade line" parallel to the
     Main Line between Paoli and Thorndale as part of a larger
     project to construct an additional freight line from the
     Susquehanna River to New Jersey, bypassing Philadelphia. 
     However, a West Whiteland land owner, Dr. Joseph Price, sued
     in court and won a decision that prevented the PRR from
     doing so, because the new track did not satisfy the
     provision of the original 1846 charter that allowed the
     construction of branch lines to "promote the convenience of
     its [the county's] inhabitants."  The new line would not
     cross any new territory, nor would it provide any new
     stations.

     As a consequence, the railroad was prevented from condemning
     property to build the new road, and could only do so if it
     bought the property outright.

------------------------
1903/10/23     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 24, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     A locomotive derailed between East Biddle and East
     Washington Streets yesterday and struck a corner of the
     Sharpless Separator Works, knocking a hole in the wall.

------------------------
1903/12/02     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 2, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     The PRR, responding to complaints by West Chester
     passengers, agreed not to operate any more "small trains"
     over either of the lines that ran to Philadelphia. 
     Previously, trains usually consisted of a locomotive, a
     coach and a combination car, but in the future, all trains
     would have at least two coaches and a combination car.

------------------------
1906 "To Keep the Cars Warm" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (incomplete
     date, 1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
     Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     The PB&WRR installed steam lines along several sidings near
     the old roundhouse at Nields Street to keep passenger cars
     warm throughout the night.  That way, they were already at a
     comfortable temperature when they went into service in the
     morning.

------------------------
1906 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     Brown predicted that in the future, railroads would depend
     more on gasoline power coupled directly to the wheels, and
     not used to drive electrical generators.

------------------------
1906 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     The author noted how the size of railcars had grown in the
     last forty years.  Instead of five-ton coal cars, fifty tons
     was now normal, and engines had grown in weight from seven
     tons to 65 tons, and 106-ton locomotives were no longer
     uncommon.  In 1866, a train weighing 300 tons was thought to
     be heavy, but by 1960, trains weighing 1350 tons were
     common.

------------------------
1906/01/05     "A Portion of the Iron Work is Now in Place" in
               DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 5, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     The PRR rebuilt the Barnard Street bridge, raising it,
     eliminating a trestle support in the center to free up the
     street below, and eliminating one track across the bridge (3
     tracks instead of 4.  The 4th track, a siding to a coal
     company,was placed on a separate span over the street.).

------------------------
1906/01/06     Alford Kelley, "Injurious Unnecessary Railroad
               Whistling" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 6, 1906),
               in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     This letter to the editor complains that railroad whistles
     are dangerous for the human nervous system and should be
     prohibited in West Chester.

------------------------
1906/01/10     "May Lose Frazer Train" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (January 10, 1906), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad, Frazer
               Branch" 

     Since a trolley line was compelted from West Chester to
     Downingtown, few people used the PRR-Frazer for connections
     to the west.  There were rumors that the PRR would cancel
     passenger service on the PRR-Frazer and direct all West
     Chester passengers towards Philadelphia on the PRR-Media. 
     The article also mentions that the Pennsylvania Railroad
     might also "soon own the West Chester Street Railway."

------------------------
1906/01/11     "Looking for Third Rail" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (January 11, 1906), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad, Frazer
               Branch" 

     Talk of closing the PRR-Frazer passenger service prompted
     several unidentified "railroad men" to propose the
     construction of a "third rail" electric line from Frazer to
     West Chester.

------------------------
1906/04/01     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 2, 1906), in CCHS clipping
               file: "West Chester Transportation, PA. RR 1905-
               1909."

     A train reached the borough carrying the goods of the late
     Dr. Jacob Price of East Bradford township, including 14 cows
     which needed milking.  Residents of the East Ward were
     invited to take the milk, and "the cars were besieged by
     men, women and children with all sorts of receptacles to get
     a portion of the milk.  It was freely given away to all
     comers, and was thankfully received by them. . . . The
     spectacle was a rather unusual one in West Chester."

------------------------
1906/04/10     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 10, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     Holland G. Malin was recently the assistant baggagemaster at
     Market Street, but now lives in New Mexico.

------------------------
1906/04/18     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 18, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     Christian Kautz and Eli Rambo, gatekeepers at Market Street,
     added an annex to their booth with enough room to store some
     clothes or supplies.

------------------------
1906/04/18     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 18, 1906), from the CCHS
               clippings file.

     West Chester Streets Commissioner John C. Heed announced
     that improvements would be made to E. Union Street at the
     PRR crossing.  The PRR decided to leave an at-grade
     crossing, so West Chester borough opted to raise the street
     level and pave it.  This was an improvement for the horse
     teams that carried freight away from the PRR freight station
     on E. Union Street.

     The same article mentioned that the East Barnard Street
     "underhead" bridge was not yet finished.

------------------------
1906/04/22     "Changes" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 22, 1906), in
               CCHS clipping file: "West Chester Transportation,
               PA. RR 1905-1909."

     Mrs. Sarah Johnson resigned as cleaning woman for the Market
     Street station waiting room.  She may be replaced by a
     "white woman."

------------------------
1906/04/26     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (April 26, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     This article mentions several odds and ends, including the
     fact that Alvin Martin of Chadd's Ford became the new
     assistant baggagemaster, replacing William Morgan when he
     was promoted to replace Holland G. Malin.  The baggagemaster
     is D. B. Colehour.

     Conductor Wellington G. Priest recalled that he worked a
     carpenter for 17 years before transferring to railroad
     operations thirty years ago.

------------------------
1906/05/12     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 12, 1906), in CCHS clipping
               file: "West Chester Transportation, PA. RR 1905-
               1909."

     Shipments of old iron from West Chester to foundries
     continue.  Roughly one car a day full of junk iron leaves
     West Chester, but the supply is not depleted because junkmen
     bring in new material from rural areas.

------------------------
1906/07/28     "Bicycles Are Buried Under Falling Wall, Happily
               Nobody Was Hurt" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 28,
               1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     Freight cars crashed into the south wall of the Market
     Street station, causing it to collapse onto bicycles owned
     by a number of railroad patrons including Charles Murtaugh,
     Charles McFarland and Harry Farra, all of whom had taken the
     train out-of-town.

------------------------
1906/07/30     "Good Repair Work" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 30,
               1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     Only two bicycles were damaged in the accident on July 28. 
     One belonged to Harry T. Ferrell of Dean Street, who worked
     at the Broad Street station.  The other, an old bicycle of
     little value, belonged to Charles H. Andrews.

------------------------
1906/08/14     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 14, 1906),in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     The PRR operated its second excursion to Atlantic City
     today, and sold 250 tickets in West Chester alone.  That was
     about one hundred more than were sold for the previous
     excursion.

------------------------
1906/08/22     "Was Large Excursion" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August
               22, 1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     The last excursion of the summer to Atlantic city was a huge
     success, although not as many people from West Chester went
     along as on earlier excursions.  "The colored people, who
     generally go on the last excursion of the summer, were out
     in force.  Lincoln University, Rowlandsville, Oxford,
     Kennett Square and Concordville furnished a big share.  Ten
     coaches were required to convey them to and from the shore. 
     It was decidedly the largest of the season.  No accidents
     occurred, the crowd was orderly and a good time in general
     was had."

------------------------
1906/09/19     "Agents Transferred" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (September 9, 1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West
               Chester Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     Clarence G. Pyle, first assistant to D. B. Colehour of the
     PRR Market Street station, was transferred to Kennett and
     replaced by a temporary substitute, J. K. Hambleton.

------------------------
1906/10/11     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 11, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     D. K. Devon of Kelton became the permanent first assistant
     to D. B. Colehour, agent at the West Chester Market Street
     station.

------------------------
1906/10/15     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (October 15, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     Dr. W. S. Webb, an official of the New York & Hudson
     Railroad, visited West Chester with a friend and two ladies
     during a lengthy pleasure trip.  They traveled by day in an
     automobile, but arranged to have the parlor car "Elsmere"
     placed on a convenient siding each evening to provide them
     with food and lodging.

------------------------
1906/11/06     "Thinks Auto Hack Would Pay" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (November 6, 1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West
               Chester Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     A North Ward citizen complained that he had to take a
     trolley and then walk almost as far again to reach the train
     station.  "An automobile could deliver passengers in one-
     third the time with much more satisfaction to patrons.  I
     believe it would pay."

     The article mentioned that J. Max Meyer Jr. of West Chester
     had considered starting such a service but gave it up when
     other matters became pressing.

------------------------
1906/11/08     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (November 8, 1906), in CCHS
               clipping file: "West Chester Transportation, PA.
               RR 1905-1909."

     The PRR constructed new cattle chutes near its Union Street
     freight station, and closed the old chute located between
     Gay and Market Streets.  This pleased the neighbors.

------------------------
1906/12/18     "Ralston R. Hoopes Gets $4500 for Land Taken by P.
               B. & W. R. R." in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (December 18,
               1906), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA. RR 1905-1909."

     Hoopes sued the railroad for $27,000 in damages for the loss
     of a strip of land along the railroad between Barnard Street
     and Magnolia Street.  The jury awarded him only $4500.

------------------------
1906/12/31     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (January 1, 1903), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     As part of a test by the PRR, a gasoline-powered railcar
     reached West Chester for the first time, operated by
     Assistant Trainmaster H. C. Smith, a motorman and an expert
     engineer.  The car was named "Oregita," was the size of an
     ordinary trolley car, and carried upholstered chairs for the
     officials.  A small engine room was located at one end.  (A
     handwritten note says that the cars real name was "Ogerita,"
     not "Oregita.")  It remained in town for 14 minutes while
     many people looked at it, then continued at 5:10pm to
     Downingtown and Lancaster.

     People viewed the arrival of the gasoline-powered train as
     the "death knell of the steam boilers and engines."  The
     article offered several ideas about possible uses for the
     new trains, and implied that the ultimate goal was to reduce
     the operating costs of passenger travel so the Pennsylvania
     Railroad could compete with the trolley companies.

     "If one can whirl to Downingtown or Lenape in an automobile
     carrying a half-dozen persons over dirt roads for eight or
     nine cents the trip, why could not gasoline carry a carload
     of persons over a graded track at a corresponding expense?" 
     JJ: cost of transportation.

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