welcome to Riggtown logo

History of the West Chester Railroad to the PRR takeover in 1879

---   Go to Riggtown Home or the HIS480 Syllabus   ---

This file contains assorted facts from Chester County history collected by students in the HIS480 "Computer methods of historical research" class at West Chester University. Each fact consists of specific information, a reference note to its source, and a date. The "facts" are organized in chronological order.

This file has not been completely proofread, nor have the sources been verified, so use this material with caution.

Collected by Jim Jones, David Flogaus, Kelly Kulp-Bosler, Mike Wolford and Bob Gialanella (Spring 1995). Additional information collected by Daniel Cleary, John Morrison, Scott Harre, and Robert Troutman (Spring 1996); and by Nicole Bowman, Karin Flippin, Mary Kurtak, Kelly McVeigh, Wendy Smoker, and Brian Toombes (Spring 1997). Last edited by Jim Jones (August 9, 1997).

Special thanks to Don Callander of the West Chester Railroad Company for providing notes, photocopies and other materials.




1811      James Alan McPherson, and Miller Williams, eds.
          RAILROAD: TRAINS AND TRAIN PEOPLE IN AMERICAN CULTURE
          (New York: Random House, 1976), 3-4.

     In 1811, the Erie Canal Commission said no to the
     construction of a railroad, even though it would have been
     cheaper and more efficient than building a canal.

------------------------
1820 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 1,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     During the period 1820-1833, a large horse wagon freighting
     and passenger business existed between Philadelphia and
     Pittsburgh.  A line of four stages ran through Chester
     County along the Lancaster Pike.

------------------------
1820s     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 2.

     The Conestoga Wagon trip took between four to six weeks to
     travel between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, depending on
     conditions.

------------------------
1827      J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL
          SKETCHES (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p359

     In 1827, the Legislature authorized canal commissioners to
     make examinations through Chester and Lancaster Counties for
     a railroad to connect with the Pennsylvania Canal.  In 1828,
     these commissioners were directed to locate and put under
     contract a railroad through Chester County via Lancaster to
     Columbia.

------------------------
1828 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 2.

     In 1828, the act was passed by the state Legislature to
     provide for the commencement of a railroad to be constructed
     at the expense of the State, and to be styled the
     "Pennsylvania Railroad".

------------------------
1830      Holbrook Stewart, H.  THE STORY OF AMERICAN RAILROADS.
          New York: Crown Publishers, 1947, p33.

     The biggest drawback to hauling goods by wagon from the East
     coast was the natural barrier of the Allegheny Mountains.

------------------------
1830 
     1857: containing a complete history of the borough from its
     first settlement to the present time. . (West Chester, PA:
     Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James, printer, 1857, 37

     The plans to build the West Chester Railroad led to the
     construction of Price's Boarding School for young ladies in
     1830.

------------------------
1830/11/15     "Public Meeting" in VILLAGE RECORD (November 24,
               1830), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     A group of citizens met in Edward Siter's public house to
     form a committee to challenge the 5th and 6th sections of
     the state canal and railroad law as "unconstitutional,
     unjust and arbitrary in its effects.  They formed a
     committee of six members "to confer with similar committees
     from other parts of the state, as to the manner in which
     redress of grievances may be had, fairly and
     constitutionally."  The committee consisted of Edward Siter,
     Robert T. Evans, Abner Lewis, Henry Carter, George Kirven
     and Abraham Phillips.  The president of the meeting was John
     Pugh, vice president was Henry Carter, and secretary was
     William Sloanaker.

------------------------
1830/12/11     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY (Daily Local News, January 20,
               1898), 4.

     West Chester's first railroad.  A public meeting was called
     on 1830/12/11, at the Turk's Head Hotel, with Judge Isaac
     Darlington as the chair and P. Frazer Smith as secretary. 
     The purpose of this meeting was to form a committee to
     estimate the cost of the proposed railroad.

------------------------
1830/12/11     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A public meeting was held at the Turk's Head Hotel on Dec.
     11, 1830 concerning the building of West Chester's first
     railroad.

------------------------
1830/12/22     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A second public meeting was held on Dec. 22, 1830 to discuss
     the possibility of building a railroad to West Chester. 
     Joseph Wilson was appointed engineer to investigate
     possibilities.  Judge Izaak Darlington presided at both
     meetings.

------------------------
1830/12/24     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On December 24, 1830, a third public meeting concerning a
     West Chester railroad link resolved to construct a railway
     from WC to intersect with the Columbia Railway line, and
     chose Dr. William Darlington to head the local committee.

------------------------
1831 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 4.

     The first superintendent appointed to the road was J. Lacey
     Darlington, with a salary of one dollar a day.

------------------------
1831 Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     The Philadelphia and Reading Railroad was organized in 1831.

------------------------
1831/01/08     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 1, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On January 8, 1831, John Wilson presented a satisfactory
     route approved by the committee.  The estimated cost was
     $88, 021.29  A charter was obtained on July 18 1831.  It was
     the first railroad charter granted by the state which was
     carried into effect.

------------------------
1831/01/08     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY (Daily Local News, January 20,
               1898), 4.

     On January 8, 1831, Major Wilson reported that he has found
     a satisfactory route and submits an estimate for $88,021.29. 
     The charter was obtained.

------------------------
1831/03/28     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 2, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On the 28 March, 1831, a board of directors was elected for
     the West Chester Railroad.  John Wilson was appointed the
     chief engineer.  By May 26, the contracts were let for
     grading the surface in mile-length sections.

------------------------
1831-1832 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
          CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
          BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.
          . (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F.
          James, printer, 1857, 37.

     "Among the causes which, about this time, began to impart
     additional animation and vital energy to the Borough, was
     the construction of the West Chester Railroad (9 miles in
     length), in the years 1831-32."  The track was constructed
     of yellow pine pieces, plated with flat iron bars.  The
     motive power was horsepower.

------------------------
1832 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37

     The plans to build the West Chester Railroad also stimulated
     the construction of the spacious Hotel, or Mansion House in
     1832 by Wm. Everhart, Esq, at the southeast corner of Market
     & Church Streets.

------------------------
1832 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     John P. Baily, Esq. was in charge of the West Chester
     Railroad.  It was the first work of its kind completed in
     Pennsylvania.  It was finished on time and within the
     estimated cost.

------------------------
1832 Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1832, a railway spur was constructed from West Chester to
     Malvern, using yellow pine rails placed on stone sleepers.

------------------------
1832/09/18     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 2, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     At a board meeting on Sept. 18, 1832, it was announced by
     John Baily that the entire nine-mile track would be
     completed within sixteen months.

------------------------
1833 Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 92.

     The first railroad was completed from Columbia to
     Philadelphia in 1833 using horses for motive power.

------------------------
1833/10/18     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 4, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The first track superintendent was J. Lacey Darlington, who
     was paid $1.00 daily.

     On Oct. 18, 1833, the PA Canal Commission completed a
     railroad line to the head of the inclined planes, located
     four miles from Philadelphia on the other side of the
     Schulkyll.  Passengers were conveyed the rest of the way by
     stages.

------------------------
1834      J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER
          COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL
          SKETCHES (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p360   

     The Columbia Railroad began operating in February 1834 from
     Columbia, Pennsylvania on the Susquehanna River to
     Philadelphia.

------------------------
1834 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 5,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     In 1834, the West Chester Railroad built a connecting road
     from Kirkland Station across to Whiteland to reach the
     limestone and marble quarries (JJ: possibly Boot Road
     between PA100 and US202).  The next year, marble from the
     Thomas quarry was available for the front of the Chester
     County Bank.  This road proved a financial loss, however.

------------------------
1834 Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY
     PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F. Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1834, the first English-made locomotive was placed in
     service on the railway spur that connected West Chester to
     Malvern.

------------------------
1834/01/01     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 5, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The West Chester Railroad declared its first dividend on the
     first of January, 1834.  The dividend was 3%.  Future
     prospects looked good at this point.

------------------------
1834/07   Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER
          COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January
          20, 1898), 5, in West Chester University special
          collections.

     In July of 1834, William Sharpless was appointed the
     Superintendent for the West Chester Railroad.  He lived in
     Philadelphia, because the company built a hotel on Broad
     Street south of Race Street.  Called the West Chester House,
     it housed the company cars and was the depot for freighting
     done to West Chester.  Sharpless had large warehouses built.

------------------------
1836/06/01     Announcement for the Philadelphia & West Chster
               Railroad Line (May 31, 1836), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     As of June 1, 1836, trains from West Chester and
     Philadelphia left at 7:00am and 2:00pm.  Tickets were sold
     at the Red Lion Hotel, No. 200 Market Street, or at the West
     Chester Railroad Hotel in Broad, near Race, in Philadelphia,
     and at the Depot, West Chester."  Signed "H. James, Agent"
     in West Chester on May 31, 1836.

------------------------
1837 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 6,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     The Chester County Bank lost half of its capital in the
     general crash of 1837.  As a consequence, the West Chester
     Railroad suffered major losses and fell heavily in debt.

------------------------
1838 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 6.

     The West Chester Railroad was heavily in debt, causing The
     Chester County Bank to lose half of its capital, many other
     investors lost all, and went out of existence.

------------------------
1839 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 6,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     No dividends were paid to West Chester Railroad stockholders
     during 1839.  The stockholders were not happy.  The West
     Chester Railroad did receive some breaks from the state on
     toll rates for use on the Columbia Road.  The directors were
     apparently maligned by the Directors.  Since its inception,
     the West Chester Railroad paid the state $30, 000 in tolls.

------------------------
1840 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 6,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     In 1840, the West Chester Railroad considered creating a
     more direct line to Philadelphia, but thought it was too
     expensive.

------------------------
1841 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 6,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     In 1841, William Sharples resigned as Superintendent.  The
     directors assumed all the duties of the former paid staff,
     without fee.

------------------------
1842 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 7,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     In 1842, expenses were reduced from the previous year $2400,
     but income on the WCRR dropped $2900.  The condition of the
     track was so bad that it needed to be relaid.  The directors
     authorized the purchase of 600 hundred ton of T-rails, but
     they only bought 40 tons before they ran out of money.

------------------------
1844/01/15     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     At the annual meeting of the West Chester Railroad directors
     on January 15, 1844, a new board of directors appointed
     Philip P. Sharples and Dr. Isaac Thomas as an executive
     committee.  Sharples become obsessed by railroad matters.

------------------------
1844/01/31     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On January 1, 1844, the Executive Committee of Philip P.
     Sharples and Dr. Isaac Thomas as an executive appointed
     Samuel M. Penten as the superintendent of the West Chester
     Railroad.

------------------------
1844/05/25     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     An agreement was reached with Canal Commission for a rate of
     $15 a train for running from the West Chester intersection
     of the Columbia-Philadelphia Railroad to the inclined plane. 
     It started operating on 5/25/1844.  Two second-hand 8-
     wheeled passenger cars were bought for service.  Then two
     new cars were commissioned from the W.E. Allison Company. 
     The baggage on these cars was carried beneath the seat.

------------------------
1844/mid  Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER
          COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January
          20, 1898), 7, in West Chester University special
          collections.

     Second half of 1844, the Executive Committee of the West
     Chester Railroad recommended reconstruction of the road with
     the same kind of rails as before, at a cost of $15,000.

------------------------
1845 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     Steam power was introduced on the West Chester Railroad in
     1845, which crushed the wooden track by 1849.  Iron edge
     rails were substituted starting in this year.  This made it
     a substantial track.   The West Chester Railroad connected
     West Chester with Philadelphia.

------------------------
1845/05/26     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On May 26, 1845, the Canal Commission agreed to haul West
     Chester Railroad trains for only $6000 annually.  (JJ: that
     is 400 trains at the 1844 rate.  Was it actually an
     increase?  Was it due to the introduction of steam
     locomotives?)  Philip Sharples reported completed contracts
     for relaying for the junction from West Chester to the
     junction.

------------------------
1846 James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE HIGH
     LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 25.

     The earliest WC&PRR station in West Chester was a two-storey
     brick structure built in 1846 to serve the WCRR.

------------------------
1846/01/19     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On January 19, 1846, Philip Sharples declined re-election as
     Superintendent of the West Chester Railroad, because his
     private affairs requiring more of his personal attention.

------------------------
1846/04/28     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 7, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     On April 28, 1846, Philip D. Thomas was appointed as the
     Superintendent of the West Chester Railroad.  There was
     already evidence that the new locomotives were destroying
     the light iron track.

------------------------
1847 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 8,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     The Directors of the West Chester Railroad proposed to
     construct heavier track.  Stockholders agreed to a further
     mortgage of $15,000 to secure the funds for this purpose. 
     Philip Sharples was again elected a Director.  Directors and
     officers of the road with friends raised $ to purchase new
     rails.  In 1847 the stronger track was rebuilt.  The debt
     was paid from profits in 2 years.  (Not true MW).

------------------------
1848      Burgess, George H.  CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF THE
          PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.  Philadelphia, PA: The
          Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 1949, 400-401.

     The West Chester and Philadelphia was incorporated in 1848
     to build a suburban line between the two points named, a
     distance of 26 miles, all south of the Main Line of Public
     Works. Or, in other words, the Philadelphia and Columbia
     Railroad. The company was not organized until 1850, and
     construction was started in 1852, and completed in as far as
     Media in 1854, and in West Chester in 1858,.

------------------------
1849 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 37.

     Steam power was introduced on the West Chester Railroad in
     1845, but the locomotives crushed the wooden track by 1849,
     so iron edge rails were substituted.

------------------------
1850 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 9. 

     The year 1850 brought the first telegraph line to West
     Chester.

------------------------
1850/10/14     J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF
               CHESTER COUNTY, PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND
               BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES (Philadelphia: Louis H.
               Everts, 1881) p360  

     John J. Parker, in some reminiscences published in the DAILY
     LOCAL NEWS of May 24, 1879, states that in 1850, after the
     completion of the branch to West Philadelphia which avoided
     the inclined plane, the West Chester passengers were
     conveyed by this route to Philadelphia.  The first train of
     cars with passengers crossed the Philadelphia Market Street
     bridge on Oct. 14, 1850, with Philip P. Sharpless (note
     spelling M.W.), of West Chester, then superintendent of the
     'old road' in charge.

     Three passenger trains ran on the Columbia Railroad - 1)
     fast line - west every morning, 2) slow line - west every
     afternoon, and 3) nightime - west in the evening.

------------------------
1850s     James D. Lynch, Jr., THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8 (Bryn Mawr,
          PA: Philadelphia Chapter, PRR T & HS, 1988), 3.

     A second railroad was built in West Chester to get around
     paying high tariffs, due to the high debt of the State's
     railroad; thus, the West Chester and Philadelphia was born.

------------------------
1851 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 38.

     The proposal to build a second railroad was animated by the
     belief that Philadelphia might be made a first rate place if
     it were not so far from West Chester.  

     "In the age of Progress and annexation, we all go
     incontinently for the annihilation of time and monopoly of
     space."  - the author.

------------------------
1851      Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER
          COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January
          20, 1898), 8, in West Chester University special
          collections.

     The proponents of the West Chester-Media-Philadelphia
     Railroad wanted to avoid the Canal Commission charges for
     the use of the inclined plane west of Philadelphia.  They
     decided the cost would be one million dollars.

     A new generation of professional men, some enemies of the
     old West Chester Railroad, and businessmen from Delaware
     County organized to build a "West Chester and Philadelphia
     Railroad.

------------------------
1851 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 8,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     The two West Chester railroads clashed.  The owners of the
     old road, finding their property value increasing, refused
     to join with the new road.  They warned potential investors
     in the other railroad, that they could lose all of their
     money.  A violent newspaper war ensued between the friends
     of the two lines.

------------------------
1851 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 8.

     A second railroad in West Chester.  The owners of the old
     railroad complained that it was slow due to the inclined
     plane that was used near Philadelphia.  A second line was
     developed by Mr. Edward Gay, a prominent engineer, at a
     estimated cost of $768,829.03.

------------------------
1851 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     (Daily Local News, January 20, 1898), 9.

     In 1851, Miss Emma Hunter was probably the first lady
     telegraph operator in the country.  She worked in the West
     Chester station.

------------------------
1851 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 8,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     In 1851, the state finished grading tracks that took the
     Columbia line directly into Philadelphia.  The line ran on a
     bridge to Market Street and then to Broad Street.  A depot
     for passengers and freight on the southwest corner of Broad
     and Market Streets.

------------------------
1851-1857 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
          CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
          BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME.
          . (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F.
          James, printer, 1857, 38.

     In 1851 a direct "road" (Railroad) to Philadelphia along a
     southern route by way of Media was begun.  The undertaking
     proved expensive and arduous.  It was being managed in the
     style and spirit which presided over the birth of the town,
     when all was "Harmony, not understood."  (JJ: Does this mean
     that the work was disorganized?)  The work was not completed
     until 1857.

------------------------
1852 James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE HIGH
     LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 32.

     The 1852 proposal called for the railroad to charge
     passengers 2.5 cents per mile, and called for two dual-
     service locomotives, six 60-seat passenger cars, and 25
     freight cars.

------------------------
1852/04/11     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 4.

     Construction of the WC&PRR began along Crum Creek on April
     10, 1852, about six miles from West Chester, near Locksley
     station.  JJ: Although Lockesley Station was about six miles
     from West Chester, this must be an error, since it
     contradicts other info in the article.  Crum Creek was
     nearest to Swarthmore Station, and sixteen miles (not six)
     from West Chester.  However, the 3rd Annual Report of the
     WC&PRR says that groundbreaking took place about six miles
     from West Chester along the Chester Creek on April 11, 1852.

------------------------
1852/early     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 3.

     In early 1852, two sets of private contractors were engaged
     to build the WC&PRR from Philadelphia to West Chester. 
     Malone, Clark and Gonder began to construct about 16 miles
     of track between West Chester and Crum Creek.  Daniel Tyler
     & Co. built the remaining 10 miles between Crum Creek and
     Philadelphia.

------------------------
1852/early     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 4.

     Construction of the WC&PRR from Philadelphia to Crum Creek
     was expected to end on May 1, 1853, and completion of the
     track to West Chster was expected by January 1, 1854, all at
     a cost of $601,600.

------------------------
1852-1854 James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE
          HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 4.

     From 1852-1854, the WC&PRR had troulbe raising enough
     capital to meet its construction goals.  That created
     friction among the WC&P mmangement, leading to the
     resignation of chief engineer T. E. Stickels on May 30,
     1854.  The board of the WC&PRR appointed Chief Engineer
     William H. Wilson (later Chief Engineer of the PRR) on June
     14, 1854.

------------------------
1853/11   DAILY LOCAL NEWS (May 13, 1947), from the CCHS
          clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     There was an accident on the WCRR at Worthington's curve,
     just below the Fern Hill (McCall's) station.  A locomotive
     overturned as it headed towards West Chester, pinning
     engineer Newton Smith in the wreckage.  He was badly
     scalded, and after he was brought to his home in Snare's Row
     on East Chestnut Street in West Chester, he lingered for
     some weeks before dying.  Mr. Smith was the father of Norris
     T. Smith,. a well-known printer in West Chester.  The
     train's conductor was David Zell, also of West Chester.

------------------------
1854/07/24-08/01    James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester
                    Branch" in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3
                    (Winter-Spring 1988), 4.

     On July 24, 1854, the Board of the WC&P voted to suspend all
     construction for lack of funds, but work resumed on August
     1, 1854, after additional bonds were issued.

------------------------
1854/09   James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE
          HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 32.

     In September 1854, the WC&PRR hired staff to ooerate its
     first revenue-producing trains in October 1854.  A
     locomotive engineer earned $2.50/day, the passenger train
     conductor earned $50/month, and the baggagemaster earned
     $35/month.

------------------------
1854/09/11     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 32.

     The first passenger locomotive (4-4-0) acquired by the
     WC&PRR was the "Rockdale" constructed by Richard Norris &
     Son.  Its purchase was authorized by the board on September
     11, 1854.

------------------------
1854/10/15     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 4.

     On September 26, 1854, the WC&PRR opened for business
     between Media and its Philadelphia terminal at 31st &
     Chestnut Streets.  The line was officially opened on October
     15, following completion of track work at Media Station.

------------------------
1855/06/13     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 33.

     On June 13, 1855, the board of the WC&PRR authorized the
     purchase of another locomotive, the "James Clark," for the
     price of $1750.  JJ: Three years later, they sold it, plus
     tender, for $500.00.

------------------------
1856/04   James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE
          HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 5.

     By late April 1856, the WC&PRR was only complete as far as
     Wawa, despite the expenditure of about $1,200,000.

------------------------
1856/04-1858/11     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester
                    Branch" in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3
                    (Winter-Spring 1988), 5.

     Because of its financial difficulties, the WC&PRR bond
     holders appointed trustees to replace the railroad's
     management in late April 1856.  They remained until November
     1858.  JJ: See LEDGER.WCP containing notes from the account
     ledger of this period.  The trustees' names were John Thomas
     and Joseph J. Thomas.

------------------------
1857 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 39.

     The author expressed the fear that Philadelphia might soon
     engulf West Chester as a result of railroad construction.

------------------------
1857 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 105.

     The schedule of the old West Chester Railroad, taken from
     LINES OF TRAVEL - ADVERTISEMENT.  Trains left the West
     Chester depot at 47 East Gay Street at 7:30 A.M., and at
     3:00 P.M.  The fare was 75 cents.  Officers of the railroad:
     President - Joseph L. Lewis; Secretary & Treasurer - S.M.
     Painter; Superintendent - Philip P. Sharples.

------------------------
1857 William Darlington, DIRECTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF WEST
     CHESTER, FOR 1857: CONTAINING A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE
     BOROUGH FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. .
     (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James,
     printer, 1857, 87., 

     Philip P. Sharples was the superintendent of the West
     Chester Railroad in 1857.  He lived at 82 S. Church Street
     in West Chester.

------------------------
1857/08/01     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     The Pennsylvania Company bought the rights to the state
     railroads and canals at auction on August 1, 1857.

------------------------
1858 J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope, HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY,
     PA, WITH GENEALOGICAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
     (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881)  p359  

     The West Chester Railroad Company was subjected to unjust
     and oppressive regulations, according to officials of the
     first West Chester Railroad.  These helped cause the
     formation of a company for construction of an independent
     line by way of Media.  In 1858 the old line WCRR was leased
     by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.

------------------------
1858 Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER COUNTY
     in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January 20, 1898), 8,
     in West Chester University special collections.

     The second West Chester Railroad (via Media) did not reach
     West Chester as planned in 1858.  The old line continued to
     make money.

------------------------
1858 James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE HIGH
     LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 25.

The WC&PRR built a three-stall engine house and turntable in WC
in 1858, and new freight facilities in 1867.

------------------------
1858/05/16     Schedule, West Chester Railroad (Summer 1858)

     The WCRR operated three daily trains in each direction
     between WC and Philadephia, starting on May 16, 1858. 
     Trains left the depot at 18th and Market in Philadelphia at
     7h15, 11h00 and 16h00.  Trains left West Chester at 6h30,
     10h30 and 15h10.  There was also a single round-trip that
     operated from Phialdelphia on Sundays at 7h45, and from West
     Chester at 15h10.  Isaac Thomas was president of the
     railroad.

------------------------
1858/07/26     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 5.

     On July 26, 1858, Richard Clark received a contract to
     complete the last nine miles of grading, ballasting and
     track-laying between Grubb's Bridge and West Chester.

------------------------
1858/11/10     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 5.

     On November 10, 1858, Richard Clark completed the WC&PRR
     track to West Chester, and the line opened the following
     day.

------------------------
1858/11/10     James D. Lynch, Jr., THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8 (Bryn
               Mawr, PA: Philadelphia Chapter, PRR T & HS. 1988),
               5.

     1858/11/10, the West Chester branch opened, completing the
     West Chester Railroad .

------------------------
1858/11/11     Charles William Heathcote, HISTORY OF CHESTER
               COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA (West Chester, PA: Horace F.
               Temple, 1926), 93.

     In 1857, the Pennsylvania Railroad took over the operation
     of the railway line between West Chester and Malvern, and
     the first train reached West Chester from Philadelphia via
     Media on 11 November 1858.

------------------------
1858-1884 James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE
          HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 25.

     The Westtown Station on the WC&PRR became a stop in 1858 and
     was known as "Street Road" until 1884.  It served the nearby
     Westtown Boarding School operated by the Society of Friends.

------------------------
1859/01/01     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 33.

     By January 1, 1859, the WC&PRR owned four locomotives (two
     Norris and two Baldwin), six passenger coaches, two baggage
     cars, four freight cars, and two 8-wheel platform cars.

------------------------
1859/04/06     Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN
               CHESTER COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West
               Chester, January 20, 1898), 10, in West Chester
               University special collections.

     A five year agreement between the West Chester Railroad and
     the Pennsylvania Railroad began on April 6, 1859.  The PRR
     took possession of the line and agreed to run the trains on
     satisfactory terms.  The West Chester Railroad claimed that
     the PRR was purposely running down the track in order to the
     lower the value of the railroad so that the PRR could buy it
     more cheaply at the end of the five-year contract.

------------------------
1859/04/16     "Retained" in JEFFERSONIAN (April 16, 1859), from
               the CCHS clippings file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA.RR 1869"

     Ziba Wollerton was hired by the PRR to serve as its agent at
     WC.  Mr. Wollerton already had "long experience" at the job.

------------------------
1860/04/03     VILLAGE RECORD (West Chester, April 3, 1860) from
               the CCHS clippings file "West Chester
               Transportation, PRR"

     Although Ziba Wollerton retained his position as station
     agent under Pennsylvania Railroad management, he resigned
     his position as agent at the West Chester railroad station
     after some 8-10 years of service with the West Chester
     Railroad.  According to the author of the newspaper article,
     "This road is now run by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company,
     and in its extensive business, everything must be done `just
     so.'--according to a system which has to be rigidly adhered
     to.  Every item of business is noted down--every act of the
     agent--every passenger, package or bundle of freight--has to
     be rigidly accounted for--while the cars, in their arrival
     and departure, note the time of day, with the accuracy of
     the town clock."

------------------------
1860's    Alfred Sharpless, A HISTORY OF RAILROADING IN CHESTER
          COUNTY in the DAILY LOCAL NEWS (West Chester, January
          20, 1898), 10, in West Chester University special
          collections.

     The West Chester-Media Railroad Company's direct line did
     better in the early 1860's under the President, Marshall B.
     Hickman.  A short time prior to the expiration of the
     Pennsylvania Railroad's (PRR) lease on the West Chester
     Railroad, the West Chester Railroad directors made an offer
     to the PRR for a buyout.  The PRR considered the offer too
     high, so Hickman then made the new West Chester-Media
     Railroad a better offer, which they accepted without
     consulting the PRR.  The PRR complained, but letters written
     by the chief officers show they were intending to stand pat
     on their offer.

------------------------
1861/05/07     "Resignation" in VILLAGE RECORD (May 7, 1861),
               from the CCHS clippings file: "West Chester
               Transportation, PA.RR 1869"

     George Fernon, ticket agent for the PRR at WC, resigned his
     position to join his National Guard Regiment.  He was
     replaced by J. Bayard Jefferis.

------------------------
1863/11/14     "Fire" in VILLAGE RECORD (West Chester, November
               17. 1863) from the CCHS clippings file "West
               Chester Transportation, PA.RR"

     The West Chester Railroad engine house burned Saturday
     night, November 14, 1863, about 10pm.  The building was
     partly destroyed and the woodwork on an engine was consumed.

------------------------
1864/04/01-1873/01/01    James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester
                         Branch" in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2
                         & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 5.

     The WC&PRR was leased by the WCRR between April 1, 1864 to
     January 1, 1873.  On March 10, 1873, the arrangement was
     formalized by a 99-year lease.  The arangement continued
     until August 6, 1879, when both lines came under the control
     of the PRR.

------------------------
1866 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     This article describes the memories of an engineer on the
     PRR-Frazer named Brown.  Brown began to work as a fireman on
     the WCRR in 1866, after working two years as a helper in the
     summer while attending school in the winter.  In those days,
     he used to finish his run from West Chester to Intersection
     (Malvern) by shoveling coal into the tender.  The coal was
     deposited on the ground from a single 5-ton railcar near the
     turntable at Intersection, and lasted for eleven days' worth
     of operation.  The author observed that "many a youth would
     have found his muscles giving out long before that, but
     Brown was made of different stuff from many of the gilded
     college boys, and he stuck to his shovel."

------------------------
1866 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     In the old days, the track was unballasted and the ties were
     laid directly on the dirt.  "It was no unusual thing to see
     the rails rise in front of the locomotive as the weight came
     upon a section of soft roadbed and pried up the track
     ahead."

------------------------
1866 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     During the early years of Engineer Brown's service, Abram
     Griffeth operated the train on the "upper road" while Brown
     ran trains on the "lower road," first with conductors Ed
     Miller and Miller Snare, and later, for eleven years, with
     Charlton D. Lack, who is now a trainmaster.  Brown worked
     with an assortment of firemen including Hugh Brown and John
     Ford (now at Oxford), Thomas Lindsay (now between Wawa and
     Philadelphia), Larry Doran (now on the Central Division),
     James Ingram, Abram Cobourn, and Abiah Miller (now an
     invalid in Media).

     In 1866, all of the water for engines on the WCRR used to be
     pumped by hand by Malachi Harris at Intersection.

------------------------
1866 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     In 1866, the P&BC was constructed to Oxford and placed under
     the supervision of Superintendent Wood.

------------------------
1866 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     In 1866, trains made four trips a day in each direction
     between West Chester and Intersection.  The first train left
     Malvern at 8am and returned from West Chester to Malvern in
     time to meet the mail train from Philadelphia.  The second
     left Malvern in the morning and returned in time to meet
     "the Lancaster accomodation."  In the afternoon, it returned
     to Malvern in time to met the market train, known as the
     "tub train" for the tubs of butter it carried.  The last
     train of the day left West Chester at 4:30pm.

------------------------
1866 DAILY LOCAL NEWS (1906--date missing), from the CCHS
     clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     The author noted how the size of railcars had grown in the
     last forty years.  Instead of five-ton coal cars, fifty tons
     was now normal, and engines had grown in weight from seven
     tons to 65 tons, and 106-ton locomotives were no longer
     uncommon.  In 1866, a train weighing 300 tons was thought to
     be heavy, but by 1960, trains weighing 1350 tons were
     common.

------------------------
1867      "More Changes at Old Depot" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS, in
          CCHS clippings file, "West Chester Transportation; PA.
          RR 1915-1919."

     An extension to the train station at Market Street was
     underway in 1917.  This article describes the changes in the
     station during the period 1867-1917.

     Originally in 1867, the passenger shed was on the West side
     of the station and the freight and baggage cars were
     unloaded on the east side of the station.  After through-
     trains began to operate in West Chester, the passenger shed
     was moved to the through tracks on the east side and freight
     was unloaded on the West side of the station, where the
     Adams Express company had its offices and warehouse in 1917.

------------------------
1867 James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch" in THE HIGH
     LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring 1988), 33.

     By 1867, the WC&PRR owned ten locomotives, sixteen passenger
     cars, four baggage cars and fifty-five freight cars.

------------------------
1868/08/23     "Obituary for L.S. McKinstry" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (West Chester, March 13, 1940).

     L.S. McKinstry was born on August 23, 1868.  Her parents
     were John and Anna Exton (Steele) Stone.  Her maternal
     grandfather was Hugh E.  Steele, who owned Laurel Iron Works
     and served as president of the Wilmington and Northern
     Railroad.

------------------------
1872 Webster, Daniel.  THE WORKS OF DANIEL WEBSTER, 16th ed. 
     Vol. II. Boston, MA.  N.p., 1872.

     "In the history of human inventions there is hardly one so
     well calculated as that of railroads to equalize the
     condition of men."

------------------------
1872/03/02     "What Idleness Begets" in The Jeffersonian (March
               2, 1872), in CCHS clipping file: "West Chester
               Transportation, West Chester & Phila. RR 1870-
               1879." 

     Five boys aged 10 to 15 were arrested for stealing iron from
     the railroad yard on last Monday.  They also put
     obstructions on the tracks.  There was a group of boys who
     were accustomed to hopping trains from West Chester to other
     stations, and who scavenged metal to sell to junk dealers.

     "It is a well established fact that idleness is the mother
     of vice, and it is a fact equally well established that West
     Chester revels in a large proportion above her quota of idle
     boys.  Our streets are thronged with them.  Boys, who no
     doubt had they the paternal influences brought to bear upon
     them as their natures require, might now be the exact
     reverse of what they are now.  They are not to blame for
     their breaches of law and good breeding.  They have never
     had the RIGHT instilled into them but have been left to run
     at large, our streets, Arab like, and the teachings which
     are thereon found invariably lead to wickedness and
     disorder.

------------------------
1874/07/20     "Smoking Positively Prohibited in This Rom" in
               DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 20, 1873), in CCHS clipping
               file: "West Chester Transportation, West Chester &
               Phila. RR 1870-1879." 

     Smoking was prohibited in the waiting room of the WC&PRR
     terminal on Market Street.  However, it was generally
     ignored, prompting this letter of complaint to the editor.

------------------------
1875/06   "Fire at the Railroad Stables" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
          (June 5, 1948), from the CCHS clipping file "WC
          Transportation, PA.RR 1940-1954"

     There was a fire at the stables located at the railroad
     depot on East Market Street on a "warm Sunday in June 1875." 
     Jesse Ehrenseller was in charge of the horses.

------------------------
1875/11/04     "Light!--More Light!! on Railroads" in DAILY LOCAL
               NEWS (November 4, 1875), from the CCHS clippings
               file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     This editorial complained that passengers on night trains
     were made fearful by the darkness outside of the train. 
     "The faint glimmering of light from within, though the
     windows are just sufficient to render that darkness visible,
     to some it brings actual suffering, and seems to forbode an
     increase in danger, quite imminent enough already, for their
     sensitive nerves."  The author continued: "Even railroad
     corporations, souless as they may be, owe both courtesies
     and duties to their patrons in return for their patronage."

------------------------
1878/05/20     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 4.

     An illustration of a WC&PRR schedule for May 20, 1878, names
     H. K. Smith as superintendent of the line.

------------------------
1878/08/08     "Ballasting Their Road" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (December 30, 1879), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad, Frazer
               Branch" 

     The Pennsylvania Railroad bought the WCRR for about $135,000
     and began to operate it on August 8, 1878.

------------------------
1879/05/12     PHILADELPHIA TIMES (May 12, 1879), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad, Frazer Branch" 

     There was a meeting of interested West Chester citizens who
     wanted to build a connector from the WCRR to the Chester
     Valley Railroad at the White Horse station.

------------------------
1879/05/17     "Still Another Railroad Project" in DAILY LOCAL
               NEWS (May 17, 1879), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     Chief Engineer Barnes of the PRR led a group of surveyors to
     the northeast corner of West Chester to survey a route from
     Malvern Station.  The author of the article believed that
     this was intended to head off an attempt by the Reading
     Railroad Company to build a branch to West Chester.

------------------------
1879/05/27     "A Corps of Engineers in Town" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS
               (May 28, 1879), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     Engineers of the PRR arrived in town to survey the railroad
     line from West Chester to Malvern.  They lodged at the Green
     Tree Hotel, and included Frank I. Fletcher, W. H.
     Colesberry, G. J. Maxwell, James Dougherty, Frank Philips
     and Thos. Morgan.  They began on the farm of William
     Marshall (West Goshen) and near the Convent, from whence
     they surveyed lines running to the turntable and the
     terminal of the WC&PRR.

------------------------
1879/06/01     "Surveyors at Work" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (June 1,
               1879), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad, Frazer
               Branch" 

     Pennsylvania Railroad surveyors began to lay out a new route
     for the WCRR (henceforth PRR-Frazer) from Frazer to West
     Chester: "starting from Frazer Station, crossing Valley Aill
     (sic) near Robinson's store, below Woodland; from thence to
     the Boot Tavern and across the line of the projected West
     Chester and Phoenixville Railroad, on Lamborne Hall's farm,
     Finegan's farm and again across the West Chester road near
     McCall's Station."

------------------------
1879/07/14     E. B. Moore to Smedley Darlington, quoted in "News
               Stories and Squibs as Culled from the Daily Local
               News" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 16, 1879), from
               the CCHS clippings file: "Transportation,
               Pennsylvania Railroad"

     The PRR announced its purchase of the WCRR from Malvern to
     West Chester, subject to approval by the two boards of
     directors.

------------------------
1879/07/26     DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 26, 1879), from the CCHS
               clippings file: "Transportation, Pennsylvania
               Railroad"

     The PRR announced the approval by its board of directors of
     the purchase of the WCRR from Malvern to West Chester on
     August 1, 1879.  The board announced its intention to
     straighten the line, install new rails, and build a new
     section from Woodland to the PRR Main Line at Frazer.

------------------------
1879/07/28     "Engineers at Work" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (July 28,
               1879), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad, Frazer
               Branch" 

     The new line from Frazer will run to Woodland Station and
     provide an alternative to 2.5 miles of decayed track between
     Malvern to Woodland Station, which the PRR planned to
     abandon.

------------------------
1879/08/05     "New Railroad" in DAILY LOCAL NEWS (August 5,
               1879), from the CCHS clippings file:
               "Transportation, Pennsylvania Railroad"

     Mr. George E. Pim, who operated a grain and feed store in
     the old WCRR station, was ordered by officials of the PRR to
     vacate by August 15, 1879, after the PRR announced their
     purchase of the WCRR.

------------------------
1879/08/06     James J. D. Lynch Jr., "The West Chester Branch"
               in THE HIGH LINE, vol. 8, no. 2 & 3 (Winter-Spring
               1988), 5.

     The WC&PRR was leased by the WCRR between April 1, 1864 to
     January 1, 1873, and on March 10, 1873, the arrangement was
     formalized by a 99-year lease.  The arrangement continued
     until August 6, 1879, when both lines came under the control
     of the PRR.

---   Go to the top of this page, Riggtown Home or the HIS480 Syllabus   ---

Copyright 2010 by Dr. James A. Jones