aof document

Service Judiciare - Justice Indigène, "Affairs connus par le Tribunal de Bamako (Soudan) et expediées au Procureur Général pour contrôle" (1934)
in ANS 3 M 154

Notes © 1999 by Jim Jones, Ph.D.

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NOTE

This file contains descriptions of various cases that were appealed and the appellate court's final decision. Based on the cases in this file, it seems like life in the village produced more criminal cases than the activity around the railroad produced.


Tribunal de 1er Instance de Bamako, n°112, Procureur Général Bamako to Procureur Général de la Cour d'Appel de l'AOF, Requisitoire n°88 (1933)

A family quarrel between Baba Séné and his wife, Sipoivé Kambou of Kati, turned ugly. In early 1933, she left him to live with a sergeant of the tirailleurs Sénégalaises named Samsan DÉ. She and her husband took their dispute to the Tribunal indigène de Bamako on July 20, 1933.

They took the morning train from Kati. While waiting for the return train in the evening, they argued and Séné hit his wife, knocking her down to the platform and crushing their baby, which was on her back. The baby died later that evening. Rage against Séné was so strong that DÉ and friends killed him.


Tribunal de 1er Instance de Bamako, n°112, Procureur Général Bamako to Procureur Général de la Cour d'Appel de l'AOF, Requisitoire n°4 (March 28, 1934)

Mamadou Diarra, a facteur du Chemin de Fer (postal worker for the railroad), brought mail sacks to the station at Toukoto on November 8, 1933. He left to eat, then returned and claimed that someone had opened one of the sacks and stolen 16,000 francs. The chef de gare, Amard Begue, and telegraph operator Bamou Taraore both testified that Diarra made his accusation before he had actually opened the sack. Later, he was found to have taken the money himself.