anm document


in ANM Z 997 fonds nouveaux, tome I (fonds privées)

© 1999 by Jim Jones, Ph.D.

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This file contains contains the following sub-files: Correspondances avec Dakar, Correspondances avec les Cercles, Correspondances avec les Services, Correspondances avec Syndicats, Divers, and one that is untitled. The basic story is that there were a series of strikes in late 1945, first by European teachers and then by African functionaires (bureaucrats). Railroad workers did not participate, although they were in contact with Senegalese union leaders.

There is no correspondence at all from the union of railroad workers (syndicat des cheminots). Most was from the services de l'enseignement (teachers) and Postes et Telecommunications (PTT, i.e. postal workers). There are several police reports from unnamed African and European sources about Abdoul Karim Sôw, a representative of the Senegalese unions, who visited the Soudan in early 1946. He arrived by train in Kati on January 13, 1946, in Bamako on January 15, and returned to Senegal on January 15.


"Renseignements de Police" n°534 (Bamako, August 4, 1945)

A "source indigène bonne" (reliable African informant) informed the police that Moriba Sissoko of the Chemin de Fer Dakar-Niger in Bamako was in touch with L'Union des Jeunes à Thiès, who were distributing a revolutionary underground newspaper called "L'Afrique Libre." Although there was no group affiliated with L'Union des Jeunes in Bamako, Sissoko asked for copies of the paper to distribute.


"Renseignements de Police" n°578 (Bamako, August 25, 1945)

Postal employees cited Chemin de Fer Dakar-Niger wages in their strike grievances, arguing that they should all receive comparable salaries because they all came out of the same schools.


Commandant du Cercle de Ségou Jarton to Gouverneur du Soudan Français, official telegram n°166/C (Ségou, October 12, 1945)

Electrical workers at the Office du Niger held a one- day strike beginning at 16h00 on October 11, 1945. Within an hour, the administration found replacements and posted guards to protect the facilities. The strike ended the next afternoon.


Gouverneur Général de l'AOF to Gouverneurs à Koulouba, Niamey, Abidjan, Porto Novo et Commisaire de la Republique à Togo, official telegram n°C/412 (Dakar, October 19, 1945)

There were attacks against the power plant, the train station and the police station in Conakry, Guinea. The Gouverneur Général de l'AOF connected this to troubles in Lagos in June 1945 and Douala in August 1945, and believed that there was a revolutionary conspiracy at work.


Gouverneur du Soudan Français Cerveaux to Gouverneur Général de l'AOF,
telegram- letter n°896CP (Koulouba, December 14, 1945)

Postal workers announced their intention to strike on December 20, 1945. (NOTE: Cerveaux, which means "brains" in French, was possibly a code name for Calvel.)


Gouverneur du Soudan Français to Gouverneur Général de l'AOF,
telegram- letter n°907 (Koulouba, December 14, 1945)

"Agents et employés indigènes des Travaux Publics, Infirmiers du Service de Santé, auxilliaires du Soudan Français" (employees of Public Works, the health service, and the administration) all announced their intention to join the strike on December 20, 1945.


Commandant du Cercle de Mopti J. Raynaud to Gouverneur du Soudan Français,
official telegram n°67/C (Mopti, December 17, 1945)

The European teachers in Mopti returned to work on Saturday December 15, 1945 following orders from their union in Dakar. The teachers in Sévaré remained on strike, but kept order in their school, refusing only to teach classes.


Gouverneur du Soudan Français Calvel to Gouverneur Général de l'AOF,
official telegram n°821/C (Koulouba, December 20, 1945)

The strike began. All workers in the capital participated.


Gouverneur du Soudan Français to Gouverneur Général de l'AOF,
official telegram n°4C (Koulouba, January 3, 1946)

The strike ended and work resumed, but the postal workers still threatened to resume the strike.


Comité-Directeur des agents et employés des cadres locaux Layes Keita to Gouverneur du Soudan Français, letter (Bamako, January 1946--carbon copy has incomplete date)

M. Keita wanted to know if workers would be paid for the 19 days they worked in December before the strike began. He referred to the 15-day strike by European teachers in November and said that they had received pay for the days they had worked.


Commandant du Cercle de Bamako to Gouverneur du Soudan Français, letter n°32C (Bamako, January 10, 1946)

The Commandant du Cercle requested permission to transfer strike agitators out of the Cercle de Bamako in order to make it possible to restore peace. These included the "anciens candidats non-citoyens" Mamadou Konaté, Ibrahima Sall and Tidjani Sidibé, and the "fonctionnaires à déplacer" Adama Sissoko (PTT), Moussa Koulibaly (headed the PTT in Kolokani), Abdoulaye Sangaré and Koro Kantao (commis-expéditionnaire Mairie), Ousman Cissé (auxilliaire au B.M. Mairie, who should in any case not be promoted to the cadre even though he was the son of the PTT director in Sikasso), and Dramané N'Diaye (auxilliaire BM subdivision Bamako).


Gouverneur Général de l'AOF to Gouverneurs à Koulouba, Niamey, Abidjan, Porto Novo et Commissaire de la Republique à Togo, official telegram n°C26 (Dakar, January 15, 1946)

A general strike began on January 14, 1946, but it didn't include the Syndicat des Instituteurs et Moniteurs Africains (primary school teachers union).


Gouverneur du Sénégal to Gouverneur du Soudan Français,
telegram-official (St. Louis, January 17, 1946)

The Governor of Senegal warned the Governor of Soudan that Abdoul Karim Sôw, "ex-Postier révoqué, Secretaire Jeunesse Thiès, Directeur Journal `Jeunesse et démocratie,' militant actif politique locale" was in the Soudan to stir up trouble.


Gouverneur Général de l'AOF Cournarie to Gouverneurs à Koulouba, Niamey, Abidjan, Porto Novo et Commisaire de la Republique à Togo, official telegram n°C56 (Dakar, January 26, 1946)

The strike ended and work resumed on January 26, 1946.